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question about interrupts/sec on a processor

I'm running a Windows 2003 Server Enterprise Edition Server with 2 quad core processors and 16 gp ram.  The core function of this server is running sql 2005.  This is a relatively new server and while benchmarking I noticed that the interrupts/sec on processor 0 are consistently over 1000/sec.  Processors 1-7 average less than 100/sec.

How can I tell if this is normal or if there is a problem with a hardware device?  Also, is there some way to spread interrupts over multiple processors if it is normal to see this behavior.  Any guidance would be appreciated.
04/16/09 Added SQL Server 2005 zone - Callandor, Hardware Zone Advisor

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FASP
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FASP
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PCBONEZCommented:
sql 2005 divides it's files up between the cores.
If one file gets huge that CPU will be busy and the others on holiday.
This guy explains it better:
http://blogs.technet.com/mat_stephen/archive/2005/02/02/365325.aspx
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FASPAuthor Commented:
Some of that was a little over my head.  I did check my databasees inside Microsoft SQL 2005 and they are configured to have affinity for all processors.  I am only running 2 databases on the server and  the largests db is only 3.2 gb.  I'm no expert in sql but that doesn't seem very large.

I'm not convinced its a sql problem.  It might not even be a problem at all but I was always taught interrupts over 1000/sec on a single processor = trouble someplace.

I did attach a screenie of the perfmon.  Its stumping me that interrupts on processor 0 are so high, so low on processors 1-7, and processor utilization is low on all.  I'm not really sure how to interpret that.  Any other suggestions?
Perfmon.jpg
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PCBONEZCommented:
Yes,
ask admin to add this question to the database and programming zones.
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DanRollinsCommented:
The %Processor Time is still under 2% so it might not be a problem.  
Have you been able to isolate this down to an SQL Server issue?  For instance,  when the SQL Server is stopped, do the interrupts/second drop off considerably?
A high number of Interrupts per second is usually symptomatic of a hardware problem.  Do you have any unusual (especially legacy) hardware installed on this box?  Are the drivers all up-to-date?
   Monitoring Interrupts
   http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc940374.aspx
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FASPAuthor Commented:
My perfmon looks pretty much the same with or without sql running.

The server itself is a Dell and not even a year old with no legacy hardware.  

I guess the NIC would be the prime suspect then?  Any way to quickly test that out?
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DanRollinsCommented:
I don't know.
Just a random thought:
It might be useful to add some I/O-related columns to the Task Manager's "Processes" tab and see if you can isolate a particular program or service that might be taxing the system
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PCBONEZCommented:
What kind of system is this based on...
>>> 
It might not even be a problem at all but I was always taught interrupts over 1000/sec on a single processor = trouble someplace.
<<<

The reason I'm asking is because if you are basing that 'feel for things' on servers with the old Netburst architecture CPU's and then trying to apply it to Core archieture CPUs that may be why it doesn't look right.
With similar clock and cache a Core based CPU isn't really even breathing hard yet when a Netburst based is maxed out.  
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