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How to send Deleted Files on a Networked computer to Recycle Bin ?

Posted on 2009-04-14
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Last Modified: 2013-12-02
I have data on a single file server on Windows Server 2008 accessed by 40 users on the network.

Is there any way that a file deleted by any of the network users goes to the Recycle Bin instead of getting deleted immediately ?
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Question by:123bora
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4 Comments
 
LVL 58

Accepted Solution

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tigermatt earned 1500 total points
ID: 24137159

There is no recycle bin when accessing a file over the network. What you are seeing where files are deleted immediately is by design in Windows; there is no way to enable a 'network' recycle bin natively.

On a network, the feature you are looking to enable is Volume Shadow Copies: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc757854.aspx. This takes snapshots of the disks in the server at times designated by the Administrator, and makes these available to the end-user to restore data directly from this snapshot backup whenever they wish.

-Matt
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Author Comment

by:123bora
ID: 24140769
I was aware of the shadow copy option, was wondering if there was another way.
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LVL 58

Expert Comment

by:tigermatt
ID: 24140796
Any reason for the 'B' grade? Only an answer of "You can't do that" is still a valid answer under EE policy, and I gave you a workaround.
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Author Comment

by:123bora
ID: 24149791
I'm sorry, I don't know any way of changing it now. Your comment was certainly helpful, but I did find a software which replaces the Recycle Bin and does the job for me.
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