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Why are workstations being kicked out of their custom program via a simple file share?

I have a network with 20 client PC's and 1 new SBS 2008 server. They are all running a program that originates on the server by means of a regular file-share. Everyone has Full control to this share. The program also runs from this share, there is no program data on the PC itself. The file opens, then everyone gets kicked out at random every 20 minutes to an hour or so.
The only errors I see in the workstation event logs say something like "Application Hung" or "Application Failed". This server was just installed about two weeks ago and people have been crashing ever since. I configured the server myself and it is currently running DNS, DHCP, AD and file/printer sharing. We don't really do THAT much with it. It's a Xeon 3330 w/8Gb DDR2, Gigabyte NIC and an Intel Server board. Any idea why they would be getting kicked out? I even just replaced the switches everyone is connected to, thinking that maybe the network equipment was outdated. Any help would be VERY GREATLY appreciated!!
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knowprob
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knowprob
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1 Solution
 
tigermattCommented:

A few questions:

What anti-virus software are you running on the server?
Do other file shares continue to work when this particular share fails?

-Matt
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knowprobAuthor Commented:
I am running AVG Anti-Virus Server Edition.
Other shares have never failed.
I'm not sure how to test if this share is really "failing". I have never been denied access to the share itself, but the program that runs from that share crashes randomly. The tech support for that program says that all you need to run it is a file share. There are no registry entries for it.
I should mention that this server replaced their old Windows 2000 Advanced Server which was about 6 years old. They didn't have these problems on that server.
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tigermattCommented:

You're not running the problem AV (Symantec Endpoint Protection) which has caused numerous issues with Server 2008, so you're OK on that front. I've not had any issues with AVG myself on Server 2008 machines.

As the next test, I'd disable TCP/UDP Checksum Offload (both IPv4 and IPv6) on the Advanced configuration of the NIC card, then test that for a few days.

-Matt
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knowprobAuthor Commented:
Does that pretty much just disable a lot of the packet checking, or what?
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tigermattCommented:

Essentially newer cards with TCP Checksum Offload enabled can calculate the checksum on the packets themselves, rather than relying on the CPU to do the same. It has been known to cause problems with Server 2008 though, which is why disabling it can be a good thing.

-Matt
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knowprobAuthor Commented:
Actually, I didn't have to disable the TCP Checksum Offload, but it's good to know about it just in case it does cause a problem at some point. It turned out that the driver I loaded for the NIC was the one which came on the motherboard's cd. I think that driver was released before SBS 2008 came out. I downloaded and loaded the newest driver and the problem cleared right up. Thanks for all your help!
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