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Active Directory to NT cross domain DHCP authentication...?

This is probably an easy question for the Microsoft supergurus here, but it's uncharted territory for me...

Here's the scenario- we have an antiquated NT domain that we're finally migrating away from, and are moving to a MS 2003 Active Directory domain.  So far the migration of the services has been straightforward, but now, I'm migrating over the DCHP service.  It isn't any problem to migrate the scopes, leases, etc via DHCPEXIM/NETSH, *but* the DHCP on the AD is showing that little red arrow stating that it's not going to hand out any IP addresses until it's authenticated. It's clear I'll need to authenticate it to the AD domain to make it live.

For the time being, becuase we're still in servitute to our major bread and butter applications, we are still having users sign onto the network using their old NT usernames, and they request the services on the AD (email, print queues, etc) via cross-domain trust as well as setting their AD usernames to give full access to their NT usernames.  Up until now, these have been services that are given out after the user has already signed on and have already been authenticated.  

Question- If I authenticate the DHCP to the AD domain, will it refuse to hand out leases to users signing onto the old NT domain becuase it will only allow DHCP requests from users signing onto the AD domain?  Or, will the DHCP give leases to the NT domain usernames becuase of the cross-domain trust?  OR, is there an additional step I need to do after I authenticate the DHCP to get it to give leases to users signing onto the NT domain?

It just occurred to me that I should probably ask before flipping the switch, so that the users won't beat me up for inadvertedly locking them out...thanks for your help!
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goodoldave
Asked:
goodoldave
1 Solution
 
oBdACommented:
You don't authenticate the DHCP service, you *authorize* it in AD to start. All the authorization does is allowing the DHCP service in the AD domain to start handing out DHCP addresses.
Once the service is authorized, it will hand out IP addresses to anyone.
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goodoldaveAuthor Commented:
THANK YOU!  Exactly the answer that I was looking (and hoping) for!

For your super speedy response, I'm upping the point value for this question.  Thanks again!
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