Can't access a secondary drive on a network.

OK, maybe I didn't explain the problem in a clear enough manner last time, so let me start all over again...

The two main machines involved are:

Machine A:  Sony laptop running Windows Vista.  1 hard drive
Machine B:  Desktop running Windows XP Pro SP3. 2 hard drives.

We are trying to get Machine A to access both hard drives in Machine B.  We have shared both hard drives in Machine B.  Machine A has full access to the C drive in Machine B(the main drive).  No problem.  Then we shared drive D in Machine B.  Machine A can see it, but not access it.  We used the same sharing proceedures as the C drive, but are still not able to have full access to the D drive in Machine B.  We are getting an error message that says we don't have the proper permission to access the D drive in Machine B.  Simple file sharing is activated and we can still only see the D drive in Machine B...not access it.
Accessing the C Drive in Machine B is still happening, but we can still only see the D Drive and not access it.
Since our error message says that we don't have the proper permission to access the D Drive in Machine B, we gave the "Guest" administrator permissions in the Users on Machine B...but still we cannot access the D drive in Machine B.  It still says we don't have the proper permission to acces it.
How do we give permission to access the D Drive in Machine B?  
NCSAVAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
mikey1hConnect With a Mentor Commented:
On machine B     open my computer, right  click Drive D, and properties.    under sharing, check permissions and make sure that woever you are assigning rights to, and/or everyone is listed and has full control.   if not there, click the add button and put them in.

then under security, do the same
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Vince GlissonOwnerCommented:
Right click on the D drive on machine B,go to properties, under the security tab look for the user account from machine A that you want to have access to drive D on machine B.
If its not there you need to add it.
What does your network look like, windows domain - small office network, etc...
mesavince
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Ron MalmsteadInformation Services ManagerCommented:
Is the drive formatted NTFS ?

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Ron MalmsteadInformation Services ManagerCommented:
On Machine B,

CONVERT D: /FS:NTFS
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NCSAVAuthor Commented:
OK, I have tried what you all have suggested with no luck at all.  The drive we're tyring to access is formatted NTFS and the network is a home network.  We still cannot access the D drive on the B machine.  

Any other ideas??
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mikey1hCommented:
try to map the drive , but use the ip address of the shared folder....  when you map it,      format the location as   \\ipaddress\sharename

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Vince GlissonOwnerCommented:
What is the share name, does it end with a $ sign?
When you add permissions for the D: drive, are you adding the account that is on Machine A.
Machine A\user
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NCSAVAuthor Commented:
mikey1h,

It won't map.  It says that I don't have the permission.

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NCSAVAuthor Commented:
MesaVince,

Nope, no "$" after the drive letter.  Already checked for that.  Now, where are you adding the permissions?  Are you going to "Manage"?  Are you going to "My Computer" --> "Sharing"?  If so, I saw no place to add a specific user.

One thing to note...When I share the "C" Drive on Machine B, Windows automatically sets the folder settings.  It does not do that for the "D" Drive.  
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mikey1hCommented:
On my computer, right click the drive >sharing and security
There should be a button there for permissions.    also don't forget to check the security tab and make sure the appropriate users are allowed there as well
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Ron MalmsteadInformation Services ManagerCommented:
Sounds like you have windows "simple file sharing" turned on....

You can turn it off and "take ownership" of the entire drive and it's contents.

Open a folder...click "Tools>Folder Options, choose the "Veiw" tab.... and the last option in the underlying list is "Use Simple File sharing"...  uncheck that....

Now right click the D: from "my computer"..... look for the "security" tab... click  "advanced" button....and choose the "Owner" tab....   choose the current account as the new owner, check the bottom box to apply to all sub folders/files... click ok, click apply...   wait ....

Close the property page and re-open it.... you should have the ability to both browse the drive and set new ntfs security on it.
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NCSAVAuthor Commented:
OK...got the solution.

I aplologize for not writing sooner, but all the solutions above did nothing.  I want to thank you for trying, but there was no solution which worked.

I finally had to call Microsoft and pay money for the answer, which I will now share with you.

To get full access, you have to open "My Computer" on the Vista machine and go to the hard drive in question.  Right click on the hard drive and go to "Sharing".  Once at "Sharing", you click the "Security" tab which will show the permissions.  You then delete all the permissions and add "Everyone" with full administrative access.  Restart the machine and you're up and running.
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mikey1hCommented:
Author stated that this was due to adding EVERYONE to the securities.     In the first post (mine) for this question, I instructed him to make sure all users AND e3veryone had full control;
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Ron MalmsteadInformation Services ManagerCommented:
I also object...
mikey1h was right on the money....
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NCSAVAuthor Commented:
All,
Allow me to present the difference between the solution Microsoft gave me and your solution.

Mikey1h gave the following solution...
"...In the first post (mine) for this question, I instructed him to make sure all users AND e3veryone had full control;"

What I posted was very different. It included what Mikey1h suggested, but his suggestion did not work until...and let me quote here..."You then delete all the permissions...".

Just simply adding "Everyone" to the permissions doesn't work...you have to blow out everything else and then add "Everyone".

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mikey1hCommented:
not so.....    we have different user accounts set up here for various permissions  and EVERYONE set as read only, and they all work together.    in order for a user account to override the everyone settings, the account would have to be set to deny a cerain permission
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Ron MalmsteadInformation Services ManagerCommented:
I agree with mikey still,

Whether or not you "blow everything out".... if the everyone group was added to share permissions as well as the security tab with full control...as was stated, it's essentially the same exact solution Microsoft walked you through...

As long as there were no DENY permissions overriding it on the security tab...which would have been pretty obvious just looking at the list, then it would work as expected.

I'm assuming you didn't look at the security tab as mikey1h instructed in the first post.... but when you talked with microsoft they had the advantage of walking you through it step by step over the phone with the same exact solution.

Don't be stingy with the points man.... keep in mind that all of us experts do this for free.
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Vince GlissonOwnerCommented:
messavince votes for #3 post id = 24139982
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Ron MalmsteadInformation Services ManagerCommented:
3 !
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mikey1hCommented:
3
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