Solved

are cancer tumors removed during routine testing?

Posted on 2009-04-14
19
113 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-06
I have a colonoscopy coming up in July.
I'll be asleep and alone. If the doctor finds a tumor, will he remove then or leave the area and go to his office and decide the the best way to attack it?

Reason.........
1995 I had this test. He removed pre-cancerous polyps but never told me. He was concerned that I might get upset since he knew I was taking meds for depression.
I found out 5 years later when going to his office to arrange the 5 year test.
Was he ethical in this lack of disclosure?
I want and need the know the results no matter the consequences. I think I have legal rights to the results, unless he knows I NEED to know and just removes something like a tumor but does not record the findings in my file.
Another question I have not been able to locate is what % of polyps become pre-cancerous? My father says all of them are pre-cancerous, meaning the doctor did not hide anything. I've never been able to confirm this. LOOKING for proof if you can find it.

Is it ok to ask to have a WITNESS in the testing room, so the friend can find out what is found and what the actions were?
I'm 3.5 years late having the every 5 year test.
0
Comment
Question by:nickg5
  • 9
  • 6
  • 2
  • +1
19 Comments
 
LVL 16

Accepted Solution

by:
dhsindy earned 300 total points
Comment Utility
I go to one of these support groups listed and they also have patient support groups:

http://www.thewellnesscommunity.org/corporate/worldwide.php

don't know exactly where you are located.

Also, I would google the American Cancer Society.

The doctor should be sensitive to your wishes (provided you express them before hand) or I would find another doctor.
0
 
LVL 25

Author Comment

by:nickg5
Comment Utility
what if I want NO tumors removed, malignant or not, basically death by colon cancer.
Will a doctor honor that?

I think if he finds more polyps or a tumor and removes them without my permission and knowledge, I think it is wrong. I have no control because I'll be asleep.

To remove something in a subsequent test would involve double the cost.
0
 
LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:dhsindy
Comment Utility
If the doctor is going to do the test and not remove questionable tissue for testing, what is the point in doing the test at all?

Why not delay the test until you decide you want to receive the best treatment available?

As for being asleep, you could give a trusted person power-of-attorney?  Able to make decisions in your behalf as long as you are alive.
0
 
LVL 31

Assisted Solution

by:awking00
awking00 earned 200 total points
Comment Utility
First, all polyps are pre-cancerous. Secondly, a colonoscopy is not just a test, it is designed to find and remove any polyps. Thirdly, if you don't want the doctor to remove any polyps without your permission, you don't have to be put to sleep, just numb enough so as not to be too uncomfortable and you can watch the entire procedure. Additionally, if any tumors are found, malignant or otherwise, the colonoscope is not the instrument to deal with that instance and an entirely different type of surgical procedure will be proposed that will require your consent. As a last statement, my best friend died last year of colon cancer and, believe me, you don't want to go there. If you do, then quit having colonoscopies.
0
 
LVL 25

Author Comment

by:nickg5
Comment Utility
ok, so if a tumor is found it would be removed or attacked in a separate procedure which is good.

My father, age 88, has prolonged his life, probably, because of his fight against heart disease, two angioplasty's and a pacemaker. Now he has parkinsonism and could live in a wheel chair and not be able to swallow for years since Parkinsonism does not cause death.
He is very upset and depressed by this condition. I said, if you want another way to die, like a heart attack, find a doctor to remove your pacemaker or when the battery needs changing don't change it.

I live alone with no children or family. There some diseases that would be terrible for me like Altzheimers.
I'm spelling alot of words wrong now at age 58 and getting words mixed up. LIke I want to type "could" bbut I get "would", and the C and W are not close enough on the keyboard for it to be a typographical error. If I have some seriousness illness, I need to know. I don't need some doctor to with-hold info from me because he thinks I might get upset since I am depressed. I need to know the truth so I can make plans.
0
 
LVL 25

Author Comment

by:nickg5
Comment Utility
if all polyps are pre-cancerous, why didn't my doctor, 5 years after the fact, just say I removed 3 polyps. WHy did he have to tack on pre-cancerous?
0
 
LVL 31

Expert Comment

by:awking00
Comment Utility
Ask him.
0
 
LVL 25

Author Comment

by:nickg5
Comment Utility
he with holds medical test results, if they are negative, because he knows I'm depressed and the news might upset me. I say BULL.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:bigbelly72
Comment Utility
Physician here, just joined.

Not all polyps are precancerous.  Hyperplastic polyps do not increase your risk of colon cancer.

The consent for colonoscopy usually also includes "polypectomy if indicated".  You would have to ask specifically to only have a colonoscopy without polypectomy.

You should have been told about the pathology after your colonoscopy.  It may be gray medicolegally if he told you the correct follow up interval (5 years for some types of polyps and family history).  Full disclosure of results is important ethically.

0
Better Security Awareness With Threat Intelligence

See how one of the leading financial services organizations uses Recorded Future as part of a holistic threat intelligence program to promote security awareness and proactively and efficiently identify threats.

 
LVL 25

Author Comment

by:nickg5
Comment Utility
He said mine were pre-cancerous but he told me 5 years after the removal.

This time my test is 4 years late, so it has been 9 years.
If he finds a cancer tumor can he remove it during the colonoscopy procedure?
0
 

Expert Comment

by:bigbelly72
Comment Utility
You don't know if it is cancerous until the pathology comes back, but usually all polyps and masses are removed.  If it does turn out to be cancerous but has not invaded the stalk of the polyp then that's it, no chemo/radiation/surgery - ie cure.  That's one of the reasons colonoscopy is so important.

I'm not clear on the timeline:

1995 colonscopy - find precancerous polyps.  Told you to have a follow up at 5 yrs but did not disclose path results because of depression.

2000?  Set up 5 yr follow up colonoscopy and find out the path result?

So 4 yrs late would be 2004?  are we 9 years late?

IDK if he would allow a witness, depends on him and the endoscopy center policy.  It would not hurt to ask, but it is not a "right".



0
 
LVL 25

Author Comment

by:nickg5
Comment Utility
age 44 first colonoscopy 1995, I did not call for results and they did not call me.

age 49, 2000, went to arrange the next 5 year test and found out then that precancerous polyps were removed in 1995. My only belief is he did not tell me because he knows I'm depressed and BAD news might be upsetting. I say FOUL and BULL.

My father said ALL polyps are precancerous so the doctor not telling me he removed some was not material.

Next test schedulled at age 54 in 2005, no test due to lack of insurance so test will be in 2009 or 4 years late and 9 years since last test.

Will be done at the main hospital, not sure if the "room" will be called Endoscopy.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:bigbelly72
Comment Utility
"FOUL and BULL" is correct.  Results should have been given to you.  This may have changed your decisions.

Unfortunately your father is not correct.  Not all polyps are precancerous.

Get the colonscopy.  BTW - what was the result of the 2000 colonoscopy?

0
 
LVL 25

Author Comment

by:nickg5
Comment Utility
2000 result was negative I think, negative as in no polyps.

I'm concerned the doctor might remove something beside polyps without my permission and knowledge.

 On another forum somebody said tumors would be removed in a separate procedure??????

I'm pretty sure (95%) my family doctor will get the results for me.
or I can sign a release and get them released to me, I'm sure.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:bigbelly72
Comment Utility
Well, if there is some mass in your colon you should probably get it removed.

Seperate procedure?  Maybe if the prep was bad, or the lesion was extensive.  But most polyps can be removed during the colonoscopy.

Luckily your 2000 scope was negative.  
0
 
LVL 25

Author Comment

by:nickg5
Comment Utility
What I meant was it is routine to remove polyps during colonoscopies but what about tumors?
Will a cancerous tumor be removed?

What can I do to be the one to decide whether a tumor is removed or not?

Have a witness at the testing?
Refuse to sign the consent form?
Skip the test and forget it?
0
 

Expert Comment

by:bigbelly72
Comment Utility
Don't skip the testing.

If there is any lesion in the colon (polyp, mass, tumor, anything!) the gastroenterologist should try to at least biopsy it and preferably remove it.  You want to know what these are!

If a large tumor is discovered, biopsies would be taken, and probably no attempt at removal would be made.

There is little you can do to decide if a tumor is removed or not.  It should be up to the specialist who is doing the procedure.

If you are uncomfortable with the colonoscopy you could may for annual stool testing for blood and a barium enema about every 5 years.  This is not recommended, but techinically it does satisfy the reaquirement for colon cancer screening.  This may not apply to you because of your history (polyps).

0
 
LVL 25

Author Comment

by:nickg5
Comment Utility
I tried the barium enema once and repeated the cleaning process 3 times as many times as what was instructed and still the test was blown. Barium swallow and barium enemas won't, unfortunately, be able to save my life. Can not get cleaned that way and gag at the thought of swallowing plaster of paris.

This thread may be missing some dialogue and/or it could be in another thread, here or elsewhere.
Not wanting to open a can of worms, but I, like a huge % of the population, believe in the right to die (how or when or where, etc).
I may not want a tumor removed. It depends on many factors.
Someone said, stop getting colonoscopies.

My father told me to stop since he did not have a colonoscopy until age 80+ and no cancer in the family. He thinks no cancer in the family is a 100% guarantee of no cancer, other than the kind you cause yourself like drinking or smoking which I do not do. I told him people with a history of polyps, ME, are supposed to get the test every 5 years over age 50 and this is recommended by the American Cancer Association.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:bigbelly72
Comment Utility
If you only want the colonoscopy for diagnostic purposes then make it clear to the doctor.

You are absolutely correct in that you have the final decision about what is done to your body.  I thought you were getting the colonoscopies to evaluate and treat possible colon problems.  

That somebody that says stop getting colonoscopies may be right, especially if you are sure you do not want tumors removed and you are OK with undiagnosed colon cancer.

I know it is not clear because there are so many factors, just communicate with your gastroenterologist before any procedure.

Your father is not correct (and you are).  Family history is a big deal with colon cancer, but it can occur in low risk people also.

0

Featured Post

IT, Stop Being Called Into Every Meeting

Highfive is so simple that setting up every meeting room takes just minutes and every employee will be able to start or join a call from any room with ease. Never be called into a meeting just to get it started again. This is how video conferencing should work!

Join & Write a Comment

Stuck in voice control mode on your Amazon Firestick?  Here is how to turn it off!!!
Whether you believe the “gig economy,” as it has been dubbed, is the next big economic paradigm shift (https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jul/26/will-we-get-by-gig-economy) or an overstated trend (http://www.wsj.com/articles/proof-of-a-g…
The Bounty Board allows you to request an article or video on any technical topic, or fulfill a bounty request to earn points. Watch this video to learn how to use the Bounty Board to get the content you want, earn points, and browse submitted bount…
Articles on a wide range of technology and professional topics are available on Experts Exchange. These resources are written by members, for members, and can be written about any topic you feel passionate about. Learn how to best write an article t…

743 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

14 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now