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Upgrading from Windows 2000 & Exchange 2000 to Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007

Posted on 2009-04-14
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Last Modified: 2012-05-06
I am looking for some assistance with the process for this.  I've read several posted articles on MS' site and others, and I'm still stuck.

I have a Windows 2000 SP4 server as the only server in my domain, so it is the DC, GC, and holds all FSMOs (verified).  I have verified that the domain is at a Windows 2000 native functional level.  This same server is running Exchange 2000 SP3.

I have loaded up a brand new Windows 2008 x64 Standard Server.  The intent is to have this be the new DC, GC, FSMOs, and also run Exchange 2007.  I looked into the reqs for a Windows 2008 server to be a DC in a Windows 2000 domain, that seemed OK.  I went to run adprep /forestprep, and received an error about a Schema Conflict with Exchange 2000.  I researched that issue more, and found that people were running into that also with Windows & Exchange 2003.  They got around it by running the Exchange 2003 version of adprep, then run Windows 2003 adprep, and all was good.  Along the way, though, I found articles that said if I'm running Windows 2008 DC's in a domain (more accurately Site) with Exchange 2000 Servers, then I must configure DSAccess on those servers to only talk to the Windows 2000 DC, and that the Windows 2000 DC must stay around until the Exchange 2000 Server goes away.

So, I configured DSAccess on the Exchange server to manual, and told it to only look at the Windows 2000 DC.  So now I must be ready to prep my domain, right?

Exchange 2007's setup program must be run with the following switches -

/PrepareLegacyExchangePermissions
/PrepareSchema
/PrepareAD
/PrepareDomain
/PrepareAllDomains

setup.com /PrepareLegacyExchangePermissions fails, telling me the Schema Master must be a Windows 2003 Server or higher.

So, it appears I have a Catch-22.  I can't do adprep /forestprep or /domainprep in order to promote my Windows 2008 server to a DC, and I can't prep my domain via Exchange 2007 tools either.  Do I have to load up a Windows 2003 DC in between to make this smoother??

Thanks in advance.
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Question by:mcrowley
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Expert Comment

by:Vince Glisson
ID: 24142036
This is about the best article you will find on the subject...

http://www.msexchange.org/tutorials/Transitioning-Exchange-2000-2003-Exchange-Server-2007-Part1.html 
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zelron22 earned 500 total points
ID: 24142047
Have you reviewed these? As an aside, if you can, I would put the Exchange Server on a separate server.  Best practice is to put Exchange on a member server, not a domain controller (but I bet you know that and don't have a choice).

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc771461.aspx

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc771461.aspx#BKMK_4
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Author Comment

by:mcrowley
ID: 24142630
Running inetorgpersonprevent.ldf has made it so that adprep /forestprep from the Windows 2008 disc is running.  Will give more progress info tomorrow.

Thanks.
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Expert Comment

by:Vince Glisson
ID: 24143069
i agree with zelron22 if there is anyway to get exchange onto it's own box it is worth it, it avoids this type of problem in the future...
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by:mcrowley
ID: 31570120
Yes, I had reviewed those articles, but I had not run the inetorgperson.ldf script.  Running inetorgpersonprevent.ldf allowed me to run the Windows 2008 adprep /forestprep and /domainprep scripts, which then allowed me to promote my Windows 2008 Server.  I could then proceed with the Exchange Server 2007 work.

By the way, the problem with most of the articles I found (including the ones you pointed me to) was that they either talked about upgrading from Windows 2000 to Windows 2008, or Exchange 2000 to Exchange 2007, but not the combination.  I hear what you're saying about putting Exchange on a member server, but I don't have that choice, and I think I would have run into these issues in any case.

Thanks for your help.
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