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AD sites NTDS Settings

By Default the Transport of the object(domain controller) under NTDS Settings is RPC, I tried to switch to IP just for test purposes, it switched the name of the object from <automatically generated> to other alphanumeric characters. I switched it back to RPC, but it didn't switch it back to <automatically generated>.

Can you tell me how to switch back to <automatically generated>, or if I just rename it to DCA for instance, will be no problem.
I also want to know, when should I select RPC and not IP or vice-versa.

Thanks
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jskfan
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jskfan
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Mike KlineCommented:
Not at my lab right now but I think when you did that you should have gotten some sort of warning saying that "this connection is not going to be automatically generated" (or something like that)
What you did was take control away from the KCC (which does that) and did it yourself.
If you delete that connection object then right click on NTDS settings and select  All Tasks >> check replication topology then it should automatically build it again.
The differences between RPC and IP are in the link below (we just let the KCC auto generate the connection objects)
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc755994.aspx
Synchronous and Asynchronous Communication
The RPC intersite and intrasite transport (RCP over IP within sites and between sites) and the SMTP intersite transport (SMTP over IP between sites only) correspond to synchronous and asynchronous communication methods, respectively. Synchronous communication favors fast, available connections, while asynchronous communication is better suited for slow or intermittent connections.

Synchronous Replication Over IP
The IP transport (RPC over IP) provides synchronous inbound replication. In the context of Active Directory replication, synchronous communication implies that after the destination domain controller sends the request for data, it waits for the source domain controller to receive the request, construct the reply, and send the reply before it requests changes from any other domain controllers; that is, inbound replication is sequential. Thus in synchronous transmission, the reply is received within a short time. The IP transport is appropriate for linking sites in fully routed networks.

Thanks
Mike
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
I have the DefaultIPSiteLink that has site1,site2,site3
But when I go to NDS Settings of each site, I don't see other DCs as <automatically generated>
am I supposed to add them manually.
I thought as long as they are in the same DefaultIPSiteLink, they should all show up in any NTDS Settings of each DC.
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Mike KlineCommented:
When you go to the servers in sites and services you should see the connection objects there.   I'll add a screenshot from my lab when I get home from work.
Thanks
Mike
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
I guess it just took too long for the DCs to showup under NTDS Settings on each site.
I don't how long it took them to show up and I don't know if there is manual process to make them show faster.
Now they show up, but not all DCs show up unders one NTDS Settings.
For instance in Site 1 the DCA will show the DCF from SIte3
Site 2 the DCC will show DCA form site 1 and DCA from site1

I don't know if it's based on the site link. if so I created a link between site1 and site2 , site1 and site3, and site2 and site3. it looks like it's all tied up.
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