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Change User Name In Exchange

One of the users in my office got married and changed her name. I would like to change her Exchange account name to the new name while still giving her access to her old emails, contacts and so on. Is there any way to do this?
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dkhancock
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dkhancock
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1 Solution
 
btrivettCommented:
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dfxdeimosCommented:
You can just change her account name and e-mail address and then add her old name as an additional SMTP address in her AD account properties. She will still be the same user and have access to the same mailbox, but just have a new name associated with the account.
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dkhancockAuthor Commented:
The first thing I did was change her name and set up the old name as an email alias. The problem came when I tried to log in to the network from her workstation under the new name. The network wouldn't recognize the new name but it would still recognize the old name, even after a week. I did find out that adding @mydomain.local to her new name would allow me to log in. But every time the machine is restarted it defaults to logging into just the machine instead of the domain. But it still gives her access to the network drives. I'm in over my head on this one and our computer consultant hasn't been much help.
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btrivettCommented:
What Operating System do you have on the client machine?  You can change the default logon domain in Windows 2000 and Windows XP Pro by clicking the "Options" button on the Windows logon box and changing the domain listed in the "Log on to" drop down to the domain you wish to log on to by default.  If it's a Windows Vista machine, or if you have some sort of policy that only allows you to log on locally by default, you may need to change the user name on the local machine.  To do that, try the following:

1.  Right-click "My Computer" or "Computer" and click "Manage".
2.  Expand "Local Users and Groups" in the left pane.
3.  Click "Users" in the left pane.
4.  Right-click the name of the user in question, click rename, and change the local user name to match the new network user name.

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dfxdeimosCommented:
If it comes down to it and you just cannot seem to get it to recognize the name change you entered into her Active Directory user account simply create a new account with the new name, copy the group memberships from the old account, and add her OLD e-mail as an additional SMTP address. Then copy her mail over manually by backing up her mailbox via outlook and then restoring it after you log into the new account.

Are you changing the Pre-Windows 2000 username in addition to the regular username?

@btrivett

Why are you talking about local users?
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dkhancockAuthor Commented:
We are running XP with SP2 on the client station and Windows Small Business Server 2003 on the server.

And dfxdeimos got it right. The x.400 listing wasn't automatically updating her name and there was a pre-Windows 2000 account name that wasn't updating either.  Account properties under Active Directory, then the Account tab. There was nothing in my Exchange Server 2003 Admin Guide or my Windows Server 2003 Admin Guide that mentioned either one of these things and my IT consultant had never seen these need to be changed manually either.

Thanks to every one for the help.

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btrivettCommented:
Because in the previous post, he said "But every time the machine is restarted it defaults to logging into just the machine instead of the domain."  When he said that, I immediately thought that he meant that the user was logging onto the local computer rather than onto his network.  So I thought back to some similar quirky problems I've experienced with smaller clients in the past.  In retrospect, though, I suppose he actually meant that his user was in fact logging onto the domain but was doing so with the old user account name.  If that's the case, then, you're absolutely right.  If the Pre-Windows 2000 username was not updated, that problem would indeed occur.  I apologize for the confusion.

If, however, everything is properly configured in Active Directory, you may want to try the suggestions mentioned in my previous post.  And, if you do decide to create a brand new user account, as suggested above, keep in mind that doing so will create a new profile on the user's computer and will require some additional effort to get everything to look and feel like it did before.
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dfxdeimosCommented:
Cool, so your question was resolved?
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dkhancockAuthor Commented:
Yes, it was resolved. Thanks again for the help.
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dkhancockAuthor Commented:
dfxdeimos figured out that part of the problem was with the pre-Windows 2000 username but I still had to figure out the x.400 listing problem.
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