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Routing issue on VLAN

I have a pacs image server that sends images offsite to be read at a local company. The problem is the users on the vlan can not access the server to pull up the images. We also can not ping the server from the vlan. All my other servers are fine, but they have a GW of 192.168.200.254 and a DNS of 192.168.200.4. I am guessing the problem is in the GW setting of the PACS server (192.168.200.100) which is the router it sends out to the other company. It seems like we need to change the GW on the PACS server or add a route. Any suggestions and help are greatly appreciated.



The current config is:

Pacs Server 1

IP:            192.168.200.5
SUB:            255.255.255.0
GW:            192.168.200.100(GRPA Router)

PRI DNS:      192.168.200.5
SEC DNS:      192.168.200.6


IMA Network
IP:            192.168.200.x
SUB:            255.255.255.0
GW:            192.168.200.254
PRI DNS:      192.168.200.4


IMA VLAN:      
IP:            192.168.203.x
SUB:            255.255.255.0
GW:            192.168.203.1
PRI DNS:      192.168.200.4
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Upstatenet
Asked:
Upstatenet
1 Solution
 
SupermichironCommented:
Set up a route on the PACS server setting the traffic to network 192.168.203.0 go thru 192.168.200.254

On Windows it should be like this:

route -p add 192.168.203.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.168.200.254

Linux:

# /sbin/route add -net 192.168.203.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 gw 192.168.200.254

Hope it will work. Cheers!
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KorbusCommented:
Why do you have this server, which needs to be access by network users on a seperate vlan (and subnet)?

vlan usually refers to specially configured ports on a router that create a "physically" isolated network.  I put pyhsically in quotes because it only acts that way.  The cables plugged into different vlans are not carrying the same singals.

a different subnet, which is what it appears you are using, is seperated only by it's method of addressing it.  In your situation you have 192.168.200.X  and 192.168.203.X.  This type of speration is purely logical, and traffic for both subnets can travel on the same cables.

If you dont have a specific reason for this server to be on a seperate vlan, and subnet: I suggest you simply change it's subnet to match the rest of your network, and eliminate the seperate vlan.


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diepesCommented:
Pacs Server 1
IP:            192.168.200.5
GW:            192.168.200.100(GRPA Router)

MA Network
IP:            192.168.200.x
SUB:            255.255.255.0
GW:            192.168.200.254
PRI DNS:      192.168.200.4

My guess at the problem.
The router 192.168.200.100(GRPA Router) does not know about the other subnets, and probably sends all the packets towards it's default gateway

Possible solutions:
1. On the Pacs server add static routes to the Vlan subnets, pointing to GW 92.168.200.254
2. Get the routers to exchange routes, using Rip/Ospf etc, to give them a full picture of the topology.
3. Change the Gateway on the Pacs server to GW 92.168.200.254, and add routes on this router , to Client networks on the router pointing to next hop GW 92.168.200.254

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