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Bridge networks 192.168.0.1 (D-Link DIR-635) and 192.168.1.1 (Zyxel ADSL2+ Router Modem P660HW-D1)?

Networks are clearly not my thing...

Inner network is connected to a D-Link DIR-635 to which both wireless and wired are connected. Only one nettop connects directly to  the Zyxel modem/router using wireless.

There is a Windows 2000 server on the inner 192.168.0.1 network which I sometimes need to access from the nettop using Remote Desktop but I just cannot figure out how to configure the two routers for this to work.

My network is ok (seems ok) except the nettop-server problem.
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jerra
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jerra
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2 Solutions
 
Thomas WheelerCommented:
why do you have two networks?
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jerraAuthor Commented:
Well I had everything under the D-Link before, the previous modem the D-Link was connected to was a simple & old model.

Because I have had a lot of problems with the wireless uptime between my netbook (not nettop) and the D-Link DIR-635 I thought I'd use the Zyxel's wireless with my netbook. This has worked 100% now for two weeks so I am reluctant to switch back using the DIR-635 for my netbook.

I bought the "D-Link network" complete together with PCI network cards, router, USB network adapter, DAP-1353 range extenders/access points etc for my computers (1 server, 3 desktops, 1 netbook). So I am stuck with the D-Link stuff and forced to use the Zyxel if I want to have stable wireless from my netbook.
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Thomas WheelerCommented:
you should see if you can set the zyxel as a wireless ap instead of router.
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jerraAuthor Commented:
OK I'll try. I'll get back later!
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Fred MarshallCommented:
The topology isn't all that clear to me:
You said:
Inner network is connected to a D-Link DIR-635 to which both wireless and wired are connected. Only one nettop connects directly to  the Zyxel modem/router using wireless.
There is a Windows 2000 server on the inner 192.168.0.1 network which I sometimes need to access from the nettop using Remote Desktop but I just cannot figure out how to configure the two routers for this to work.
My network is ok (seems ok) except the nettop-server problem.

OK - I'll try to decipher out a topology:

***
Zyxel modem/router with a public IP address on the "outside" WAN internet port
and
Some private range address on the "inside" such as 192.168.1.1
***
D-Link router's "outside" WAN internet port  connected to a Zyxel "inside" LAN port with an "outside" address of something like 192.168.1.2.
and
D-Link LAN address of 192.168.0.1 as you've stated.

***Comments and recommendations:

1) The D-Link and the Zyxel LAN address ranges should *not* be the same.  You'll notice above that I assumed they were not.  Make sure this is the case.

[I will refer to your "inner layer" as the "2nd level" and what you must mean as the "outer layer" (not mentioned) as the "1st level" for the two LANs.  The Zyxel's LAN is at the 1st level as is the D-Links WAN.  The D-Link's LAN is at the 2nd level.]

2) No computer connected into the first level will reach the 2nd level.  Conversely, a computer on the 2nd level can reach computers on the 1st level.  That's because private addresses in a different range will not propagate UP through either of the routers if they meet the standards, unless it matches its WAN range.  Otherwise such packets are dropped.

So, if a router has a private address assigned on its WAN (as your D-Link surely does), then it can accept traffic destined for its LAN if it's identified as the next hop.

See:
http://www.coastal-computers-networks.com/How%20Subnets%20Work%20in%20Practice.pdf

In your case, if you are connecting one computer to the Zyxel then it won't connect to any on the D-Link.

But, if you turn things around it would work:

Put all of the computers on the Zyxel LAN and put that one lone computer on the D-Link LAN.
Since the Zyxel is also a modem, you can't very well exchange the roles of the two routers.

If you do this then the lone computer will be able to see all the computers on the Zyxel but the computers on the Zyxel won't be able to see the computers on the D-Link.  Is that what you want?



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jerraAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the replies. I have now tried some "settings" in the Zyxel but it resulted in me having to reset it in order to be able to log in to it again.
I have decided to let it be for now, thanks for your suggestions and the information, you made me understand its not that easy to fix. I'll split the points.
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Fred MarshallCommented:
We never did get a clear description of the topology.  So, "the problem" and your objectives remain a bit unclear.

If my description of the topology fits, and if you want all the computers to see each other, here is a very simple approach.

Don't plug the Zyxel LAN into the D-Link WAN port.
Instead, plug the Zyxel LAN into a D-Link LAN port.
Then all of the computers can run in the Zyxel LAN address space.
You should turn off DHCP on the D-Link if you do this.  All the computers will get DHCP from the Zyxel.
The LAN IP address of the D-Link can stay the same OR, you can set it manually to fit into the Zyxel LAN space so you can still reach it with any of the computers on the LAN.
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jerraAuthor Commented:
Thanks fmarshall!
That did it.

I set the IP for the D-Link to 192.168.1.2 and I changed the IP's for the rest of the inner network from 192.168.0.* to 192.168.0.1.
I can now access the server from my netbook.

Should I redistribute the points or how does it work considering I prematurely closed this question?

Excellent.
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jerraAuthor Commented:
By the way fmarshall, you had guessed correctly regarding the topology of my network.
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