Removing DNS settings from Server 2003

I have recently moved a client from Exchange Server 2003 to Corporate Gmail. There are DNS settings that catch any traffic leaving the internal network going to our "domain".com and routes it back to 192.168.1.253(the primary server). I'm trying to remove this routing, but don't want to screw anything up. I've located the files there, but don't want to just go through deleting everything. Can someone please inform me of anything else that these rules may do besides redirect these connections?

Thanks,

Chris
pccbryanAsked:
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pccbryanConnect With a Mentor Author Commented:
I ended up just bypassing the DNS server at the workstation level. It wasn't at all the solution that I was hoping for... but it did the job. I pointed it directly to an openDNS server.

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Darius GhassemCommented:
You shouldn't have any problems just deleting the record but if you are concerned then make a backup of DNS or write down the settings for this record. To be honest the only way to find if it is going yo screw anything up is to remove it. This won't mess any Network Infrastructure services up but if you have a website on your local domain that is located at this address you might lose connectivity to it until you place the record back in.
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pccbryanAuthor Commented:
Ok. I paused the current domains that are controlled by the DNS server. Once I did that I flushed the DNS cache on a workstation and tried to ping the domain I'm trying to reach. It gave me a host cannot be reached message.

I'm really at a loss here on what to do. Any other suggestions.

No local website to worry with, I do have a printer that is emailing scans out to mail.domain.com. That is why we are trying to resolve this issue.
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Darius GhassemCommented:
If the domains are paused then you will have issues. You should just delete the record but make sure you have a backup of the information.
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pccbryanAuthor Commented:
I unfortunately did not have any more time to play with it. I changed the DNS server at the workstation level to bypass the DNS Server and point to an outside DNS server provided by my ISP. This worked. It wasn't the solution I was hoping for... but it was the first thing that I found met my needs.

I will leave this open for a day longer for any other suggestions because I'm not satisfied by the solution I had to come up with.
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Darius GhassemCommented:
If you are on a domain environment then you need to remove the ISP DNS server from the workstation because the workstation can't speak to the local DNS server.

Again just remove the record from DNS. Point the client to the DNS server. Make sure the DNS forwarders on the DNS server are up to date. If the DNS zones are paused and the client is pointed to them then the client won't be able to resolve any DNS.
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