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Notebook 19V 3.42A - Fitting Power Supply 19V 4.74A - Would it Work?

I have a notebook with a defect power supply that requires 19V and 3.42A DC. I also have a power supply from an old laptop from a different manufacturer that generates 19V and 4.74A DC. The connector fits, which is already luck.

I would be really happy, if I could use that power supply with the laptop, if the minor difference in ampere 1.32A too much to be exact would not be a problem and potentially damage the notebook.

I don't want to try and fry it.

Should the power adapter work? If uncertain, should I simply try? Is there any risk that the bit higher ampere might fry some circuits in the laptop?  

If it should work without any danger to the hardware, should I still get a matching power supply to prevent potential long term damage, if a higher ampere could cause that? You can drive a car in low gear too fast with too much revolutions per minute for a short period of time, but making it a habit will eventually cause damage to the engine. That's the equivalent to my problem that came to my mind.  .... or shouldn't I have to worry about this and just use it without getting a replacement?

Thanks
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Cumbrowski
Asked:
Cumbrowski
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1 Solution
 
lkravenCommented:
What you need to make sure is if the POLARITY is the same.  Is the tip and ring the same polarity as the broken one?

The ampere rating shouldn't matter.  It merely states the maximum current it can provide.  If your device only draws 400 milliamps, it would just mean that there would be a lot of excess capacity untapped.

The voltage is important-- too high and you will fry it.  Too low, and you won't push enough electrons to feed it.  Seems like you are okay.

Now just make sure the polarity is okay, and if it is, you may be in luck.

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CumbrowskiAuthor Commented:
The power supply shows that (+) is inside and (-) outside. The notebook does not have that symbol. Is there another way to find out?

The notebook is a Acer Aspire 6920 Series and the power supply is from a Gateway tablet PC. Is there any other way to find out the polarity of the notebook power connection?

Thanks
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lkravenCommented:
You don't need to check the notebook-- you just need to make sure both power supplies say the same thing.  They should.  Does one of them not?

Do you not have the old one anymore?
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CumbrowskiAuthor Commented:
I forgot the old one in the office across the country on the East Coast :(. However, I found an image of the original power adapter on the internet:

http://www.laptopbatteryinc.co.uk/images/DC19V-3.42A-65W-5.5x1.5mm.jpg

Same polarity, (+) inside, (-) outside.... I will give it a shot. Wish me luck :). Points well earned. Thanks.
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CumbrowskiAuthor Commented:
It worked :)
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