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Jewellery image color correction and matching

I have a new set of jewellery images and need the color of the jewellery to match the existing jewellery images. I am using photoshop.
An example of new image:
http://www.cubixws.com/expert-exchange/image1.jpg

I want the band of the jewellery to look like:
http://www.cubixws.com/expert-exchange/image2.jpg

I don't care about the diamond as I will be replacing the diamond through cloning. I have played around with the Color Balance and Selective Color options and have been able to get something like this:
http://www.cubixws.com/expert-exchange/image3.jpg

But I am still not satisfied and need to match the band of the image1.jpg to image2.jpg .If someone can show better results than what I have done, please give me the exact details of the adjustments to make. Please don't say that 'Play around with the Color Balance, Selective Color, Hue/Saturtation etc. etc. and you will get your result'. I have already played around and was not saitsfied with my outcome so I need an expert advice.

Please give me exact number to put when using any adjustment option. Currently I have done a Color Balance adjustment with Shadows: 45 46 0 and Midtones: 31 21 0. And then I did a Selective Color adjustment on top of it and made 'Neutrals' to +30%. Thats how I got the image2.jpg output.

So please help!
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coolvicky21
Asked:
coolvicky21
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1 Solution
 
coolvicky21Author Commented:
sorry, I made a mistake in my question. In the last line I meant 'thats how I got my image3.jpg' output
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lherrouCommented:
coolvicky21,

I suspect your issues reflect not the adjustments to the image, but the original photography. I see two issues:
One is a distinct difference in sharpness between the two images. While you can use a sharpening filter on the final image, the original must be in perfect focus and taken with a camera/lens combination which are sharp and clear over the depth of field that includes the full ring. In professional jewelry photography for ads, etc, they sometimes even use multiple photos to get the full piece in focus (i.e. one image with the diamond in focus, one with the middle of the ring in focus, and one with the back of the ring in focus, then layered and selectively merged and/or erased).
The second issue is the background to the image. Look at the reflections in the two images. Your image 1 looks like it was taken in with fairly diffuse lighting and distant background, whereas image 2 shows reflections from a background of another material nearby (above and behind) and while the lighting is even, there are a couple of clear point sources which make for nice highlights in the band and the diamond. The background reflection also provides some of the coloring of the band.

Cheers,
LHerrou
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coolvicky21Author Commented:
thanks for the photography tips. But the problem is that the pictures are not taken by me. They belong to one of the suppliers and borrowed from them. Image2.jpg was taken by me. And also I forgot to mention that I have applied a Unsharp mask filter while getting the image3.jpg output...
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lherrouCommented:
Well, image2 is nice work. And yes, I noticed the filter application on Image 3. When making your adjustments to image1, you might want to mask out the background and the shadow, so you preserve those. Then you could add a warming effect, either to the band as a whole, or to the top flat portion. I found Nik Efex warming filter worked well.
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David BruggeCommented:
Iherrou has a good eye and is right on target with his suggestions. I would take it a step further and point out that in addition to the colored background, the shape of the bands in your example and the image that you are copying is different. It is the difference in shape that will cause you the most trouble in making the images look similar.

Let me digress just a moment and address the issue of photographing reflective objects. (Other than some focusing issues, you have done an excellent job by the way!) Most tutorials teach you how to hide reflections. Look in any photo gear catalog and you find a ton of products and devices such as tents, cocoons, wraps, etc. all with the goal of making reflections disappear. The problem with making the reflections disappear is that you loose the the information that tells the viewer about the shape of the object, and if you make all of the reflections disappear, you can't even tell that the object is reflective.

What the photographer has done in the example that you want to copy is allow a strong background color define the shape of the band. I usually see this done with black, but here, they're being a bit "artsy." (See Figure 1 for the setup ) Because the band in this example is more rectangular in shape and has a flat surface that reflects a large section of this background your images will always look different. (In a moment, I'll show you how to reduce the difference)

The way that you have lit the band in your example is reflects a bright lit background surface. This makes the surface mostly highlights (no mid tones) You cannot add color to a highlight. So all of your attempts to adjust the color have failed because the color adjustments are targeting the wrong area. And because the surface is curved, even if you had the same lighting set up, it would reflect the light differently.

The first thing that you need to do is bring your highlights down a bit so that they will hold some color. But you only want the highlights on the very top surface of the band. To be honest. I have no idea what areas would reflect color and what area would not. The shape gets a bit complex where it transitions from being round to being squared off as it approaches the stone. I just had to make a wild guess. (See Figure 2)

I knew that the reflected (colored) light that was hitting the band from the top would be solid color on the top and taper off as it wrapped around the sides, just like light wrapping around a sphere tapers off as it wraps around the side. To do this I put a blur to the areas of the mask where the sides of the band were showing.  You don't want the blur on the hard outside edges of the band, only on the inside areas.

With my mask selected, I made a levels adjustment layer. In the dialog pallet I brought the white output slider (the bottom slider) down to 145. This make all of the highlights that are not masked, a medium gray. Just what you would expect if the light were reflecting from a medium shade surface instead of a bright white surface.

Next, I made a new layer and filled it with #8e6954. I got this color by sampling the image that you are trying to copy. I set the blend mode to "color." This colors everything, including the diamond and the shadow. To fix this I dragged a copy of the layer mask from the levels adjustment layer to the fill layer (hold down the Alt key as you drag the mask to a new layer. The result is Figure 3.

The Figure 3 image is too contrasty. The color is too harsh. It certainly isn't very appealing. But by pulling back a bit on the color layer and moving the levels output setting a bit, it ends up looking pretty good.

Best of luck to you.


figure-1.jpg
figure-2.jpg
figure-3.jpg
figure-4.jpg
figure-5.jpg
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coolvicky21Author Commented:
Thanks D_Brugge. Your illustrations and explanations are so much in detail and definitely helped me look at all other pictures and understand what you were saying. As correctly mentioned by you, all my product pictures like image2.jpg had the brown filter on them. The thing is that I haven't clicked them by myself. I am web developer and working at an online jewellery company and someone else from the company had clicked the product pictures.

Although I appreciate your detailed description of how the brown color came on the top and how the entire setup would have been, what mainly Im looking for is to match the band rather than give the brown color effect on the top. I am looking to match the silver color. I want the band of the jewellery to look really sharp like the one in Image2.jpg. I understand that the pictures were not taken with perfect focus but is there no other photoshop way to make them sharp like the ones in image2.jpg and give them the silver color effect?

I have attached more pictures for more examples. All ones with image1-*.jpg are the new supplier images which I want to match like the ones with image2-*.jpg. All the image3-*.jpg are some of the best effects that I have tried getting till now on them. To be honest, im more of a web developer with brilliant php and other skills, but less of a photoshop and photographer kinda guy. So what you said didn't make complete sense to me as i'm not too used to such indepth photography techniques. I'll try and read twice-thrice what you have told me and ill let you know how best did it help me. But if someone else can guide me how to get that sharpness and the silver color (im not too keen on getting the brown reflection color) as seen on image2-*.jpg then ill be really grateful
image1-1.jpg
image1-2.jpg
image1-3.jpg
image2-1.jpg
image2-2.jpg
image2-3.jpg
image3-1.jpg
image3-2.jpg
image3-3.jpg
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lherrouCommented:
You are pretty limited in what you can do with the originals that have been provided by your supplier - there's just no way to create detail that isn't there in the original. On the other hand, based on the images you've shown here, you've done a GREAT job with them. One thing you might consider is working on the adjustments for color and contrast in a separate layer than your original, and then you can both adjust the transparency of that later (giving more or less of that effect overall, and also you can selectively erase portions of the layer, so if you have over-done it for one part, but it's just right for another, you can erase the part where you feel it's too much. This is also a less destructive approach, since you can turn your layers on and off at will, and see what the effects of different ones would be in combination with one another.
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coolvicky21Author Commented:
yup ive always made sure that anything I do is in the form of an adjustment layer or a duplicate layer. Thanks for the tip though.
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coolvicky21Author Commented:
Hello everybody,

Basically I requested freelancers on various site to handle this project for me and asked them to show me sample outputs. I liked one person's output and thought it was fitting the best. But he quoted too high and the person who wants this jewellery images to be done doesn't want to pay so much.

I am attaching the sample he gave. Can anybody tell me that what exact adjustment layers and their settings would he have used?

Thanks
PERFECT.jpg
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crittle1Commented:
I completely agree with lherrou here. I've shot jewelry for sears/kmart, and yes I had to layer images to get as I wanted. It is sooo hard to shoot jewelry, I wanted to pull my hair out, LOL. But also, you can't put back what is not there, and you have to explain that to the vendor / client because they never understand why!

I also had to edit like you are doing now all day, every day.

With that said, what you are asking for is an almost impossible fit for all your images. You can't take one setting and apply them to all your images and have them turn out the same. ( for the most part ) You may get away by doing this sometimes, but in my experiences, I've still had to tweak them here and there. This may be why you are having a hard time getting an answer. Not to mention all answers are not going to be the same.  

Here is what I would've done in this situation, and what the freelancer probably has done too...

1.replaced the diamond ( Obviously, cutting and pasting it in, erasing the edges)
2. clipping the ring / diamond with the path tool, including in the shadow below. He selected the image and opened the selective color palette ( Image > adjustments) and added the color in. ( There are so many ways to add the color back in, I would do it 2 - 3 ways until I was happy with the results )
3. He may of opened the levels and moved the darken arrow over a bit, but that's about it.

But again, there are so many ways to achieve this look, it's really a matter of opinion. It's not real easy to achieve, especially if you are not real familiar with the process. <--I know that doesn't help you right? So what I'm saying is, the answers are all above, but it's up to you to just tediously deal the the situation at hand by tweaking. ( Blah! )

Sometimes I would work on an image 30min at a time until it was perfect. This may be the reason the freelancer had to charge so much... I would say so anyhow.

Not sure if this is against the forum policy, but you are more than welcome to contact me if you are in a bind.. But again, all the answers are above.. there are no magic numbers.



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lherrouCommented:
crittle1,

Good followup comment :) And yes, you can put that in your comments, you just can't offer to answer questions for anything other than points, or put the email address in the comments (in your profile is fine).

BTW, it looks like you have enough points for Qualified Expert Premium Services, but are still on Free Monthly Trial status, you should be able to click on the Edit button in your profile, and switch over to Expert Premium Services.

Cheers,
LHerrou
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crittle1Commented:
Thanks :)!!!!
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coolvicky21Author Commented:
Hello crittle1,
Yeah I had tweaked and and found that the freelancer who achieved the best result had tweaked with the color balance and made the image darker using the curve adjustment settings:

Color balance settings:
Shadow levels: 0, 16, 0
Midtone Levels: 29,15,-9
Highlight levels: 0,1,0

Curves:
RGB channel: I/p: 123, o/p: 96

Anyways I think the best possible answer was of D_Brugge. His illustrations helped the me best to understand my images and apply the settings and masks accordingly.

Thanks guys for all your help and interest..
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lherrouCommented:
Don't forget in the future that you can split points to reflect the effort put in by all involved, which still awarding the accepted answer and the most points to the expert you feel provided the greatest assistance.
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David BruggeCommented:
Thanks for the grade and the points. Like Iherrou mentioned, you can split points. I feel embarrassed getting them all since there were many good contributions.  I don't worry much about iherrou, he and I contribute many times on the same answer and he takes almost as many points from me as I take from him. As for this new kid, crittle1. I probably need to get points while I can. I have the feeling that he will be taking all of the points in the future.

All of this of course, is in jest. There are a great bunch of folk here at EE.  I don't think any of us here in the graphics zones are in it much for the points anyways. I feel fortunate to be able to learn from almost everyone who adds comments, and I only need enough points each month to keep up my membership.

Thanks again, and best of luck to you.
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