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PXE boot not traffic allowed across Enterprise

Hi,
I have inherited an administration role in which my machines are imaged in a lab with PXE boot enabled. The tech before me had set up the GHOST server to listen for PXE traffic (tftp- I think???). When a machine boots from the network adapter, it picks up on a menu the Ghost server provides. In the lab all is well.
Outside the lab I guess network admin is not allowing the traffic out. Is it tftp traffic that is being blocked. If their is a concern then what would be the best way to propose to the network admin we allow the ability to GHOST machines outside the lab, still keeping him happy that is.
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geewizzz
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geewizzz
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rfportillaCommented:
Tftp traffic has to be allowed, but you also need to have broadcast traffic working. Broadcasts do not go across routers.  I assume all of the computers are the same or similar hardware?  This solution should be tested thoroughly, then put on a server on the network and then assigned to the client machines as needed.  This is my recommendation.
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geewizzzAuthor Commented:
Could something like this work... You allow tftp, then the broadcast packets for the PXE are 'packaged' inside a type of packet that is allowed?  What about some kind of 'forwarding' being done across the router? Are their rules on the router that can be configured to accommodate?
I did some reading awhile ago about about bootp supported through forwarding the traffic?
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rfportillaCommented:
This can get complicated.  There are two ways to accomplish this.  

1. Forwarder: the router can allow broadcast traffic if it can be configured.  Sometimes there is a setting to allow bootp traffic to be forwarded.

2. Relay: This requires a server on the other side of the router to act as a proxy.  When the computer starts and asks for DHCP/bootp info, this server will collect that request, package it, and send it across the router.  

The configuration that you use, esp. regarding bootp vs pxe, really depends on what your hardware supports.  But each has different methods for setup.  
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=off&num=50&q=bootp+relay

Just out of curiosity, is this a Microsoft implementation or Linux?
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rfportillaCommented:
oops, sorry.  Wrong link.  This is the correct one.

http://www.darryl.cain.com.au/pxe/pxe.php
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rfportillaCommented:
Do you know if you are using a PXE or bootp configuration?
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geewizzzAuthor Commented:
More info...

We are running a GHOST server, the client boots off a nic and getting an ip addr (bootp) and a net config file. They are prompted for credentials and a .bat file gives them a menu of 1-9 to choose from. They select, then get the appropriate image.
I was not there for the setup of the GHOST server and the config file (watch it and it looks like a network boot disk being run).
I would like to know how they did it... GHOST server running on Win 2003 server.
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