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Networking harware configuration

Posted on 2009-04-26
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I am trying to get my own business started, and I am going to run sbs2008. My ISP is ATT with a business account. What networking hardware should I get (not necessarily brands)? SHould I have ATT install a managed router? They sent me a 2wire wireless router? I don't think that is enough, I considering getting a Netgear device (ProSafe 802.11g Wireless VPN Firewall 8 with 8-Port 10/100 Switch), and use it in adittion to the 2wire router. I know how to configure the ports and stuff, and what ports to open. I know to make sure the sbs2008 server is doing the IP distribution (DHCP), and to turn off DHCP in the netgear and the 2wire.
What else do I need? Should I go with the managed router? If so, what mode should I tell them to put it in, bridged mode?
How do I implement the devices, ie what connects to what, and how?
Also, what mode to set the 2wire in?
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Question by:xzay1967
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fritz5150 earned 450 total points
ID: 24238766
If I were you I would reconsider my choices in networking hardware. I would be more likely to purchase a used Cisco router and or router and firewall. This equipment, while being only about a 10% difference in price will allow you much greater flexibility and reliability than a home grade router or wireless router. My personal choice would be something simillar to a used 2621 with a firewall IOS on it or a 2620 and a used ASA5505. The main reason being is there is unlimited information and support from the many millions of cisco users that have had to make something work in much the same way you are now.  You will benefit from a huge userbase to ask questions of, and guaranteeing you comply with any and all security and interoperability standards.
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by:Bigoman81
Bigoman81 earned 1050 total points
ID: 24238795
X-Zay
 
 Judging by what I have gathered from your notes, it looks like your going with a DSL connection. If it is indeed a cable modem, these instructions will work as well.

1. The type of internet connection you are going to use would determine what equipment to go with it.. IE: DSL, Cable Modem, T1, Metro-E, etc etc....
  >A. If you are using a DSL and plan to run it with SBS, I would HIGHLY recommend getting a decent manageably router/firewall all-in-one. <if your planning on less than 25 users, a netgear or Linksys will suffice. Anything above 25, look into a sonicwall, lower end module of course. Plan for the future and budget for now.
   >B. No matter what firewall device you go with, it will most likely come bundled with all the bells and whistles, IE DHCP, Firewall, Gateway Antivirus, Etc Etc.  These options can be disabled and easily manageable.  Microsoft's firewall is junk, sorry Microsoft "much love for Beta 7 though", if you plan on running active directory with SBS rely on your Wan Firewall and permission sets to your PC's.  

2. Once you obtain your router/firewall device, remember you are not bound to the few ports on the device itself. A cheap switch can be purchased - turning 1 firewall port into 24/48 ports available. Most lower end switches do not require any setup, just plug in and go.

3.  Do not buy your router/firewall from ATT; ask them what model they would sell you and Google or newegg.com to buy it 60% cheaper. Leasing equipment is throwing you money down the garbage. Unless it is very costly equipment that will need to be replaced in short time

4.  Setting forwards to your devices "SMTP, Terminal Services" and port blocking is a weekly job, at least for me. I am a security freak and suggest getting a router/firewall combo that offers a regular update service "depending on how well you want your firewall to work"

I will leave you with this
MC
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Author Comment

by:xzay1967
ID: 24238816
Thanks fritz, I would do that later on. My budget is tight right now, and I want to open on May 4th. So for now, based on the equipment I mentioned earlier, how to do I implement them. Of course I could also go with the managed router that ATT will provide. The only inconvenience is having to call them to request changes to the router, ie ports to be opened or closed. But for the time being how do I connect the hardware together ie what connects to what
How do I connect the 2wire to the netgear? What mode do I put the 2wire in? This is the netgear I am considering using
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml?product_id=0234268
Will it suffice for now for my sbs2008 domain? I will apply the cisco router in the near future.
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Author Comment

by:xzay1967
ID: 24238828
Big you are correct, it is DSL. Here is what I plan to go with for now, firewall wise
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml?product_id=0234268
I just need some advice on how to physically connect them all together. Thanks a lot for all you guys' input.
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by:Bigoman81
Bigoman81 earned 1050 total points
ID: 24238863
That device should be fine.

1. connect your DSL Modem into the "Ethernet" port on the netgear.

2. Log into the Netgear and setup it up as Dynamic or static in the WAN interface menu... If you are unsure of the settings ATT will be glad to provide them for you for Free.

3. IF you are going to use SBS DHCP, then of course disable that feature in the netgear.. Just remember, if you disable DHCP on the Netgear, make a static entry to the SBS server. Also, make sure you have the Proper DNS entries in the DHCP scope on the SBS server; So your clients can enjoy the internet as well.

4. plug your clients in and enjoy.

This is Basic setup
MC
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Author Comment

by:xzay1967
ID: 24238907
Thanks once again Big, just one more thing. The 2wire is a router\modem. Am I not suposed to put it into some sort of bridge mode (not sure what) and turn the routing, and dhcp features off as well? I just want to cover enough to get me started, then in a few months (maybe sooner), I will make better adjustments.
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by:Bigoman81
Bigoman81 earned 1050 total points
ID: 24239006
The Netgear will replace the 2 wire device...for now if you want to use it leave the routing and dhcp on. This will allow the device to be used by multiple computers.. If you bridge the device it will assume another device is present and attempt to merge the 2 networks.


MC
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Author Comment

by:xzay1967
ID: 24242371
Oh, ok, I thought I needed the modem functionality of the 2wire in order to get the dsl to work. Then I could add the netgear. When you say leave the routing and dhcp on, are you referring to leaving it on the 2wire or the netgear? I also thought since this is a sbs2008 domain, I need to turn those features off, and let the sbs server handle dhcp. Sorry so many questions.
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Author Closing Comment

by:xzay1967
ID: 31574781
I would have liked a response to my last submission.
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