How can i found out which version of microsoft office was installed on my machine

Posted on 2009-04-26
Last Modified: 2013-11-14
how can i trace which version of msoffice was installed on my machine after remove from the add remove program
Question by:get000sumit
    LVL 13

    Expert Comment

    download and run this util.
    LVL 13

    Accepted Solution

    Sorry that will only tell you what is installed. If you removed it from your machine your only hope is if there is a registry entry referencing it.
    look for 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
    10 = 2000
    11= 2003
    12 = 2007
    LVL 85

    Expert Comment

    by:Rory Archibald
    You might have a look in the registry under HKLM\software\microsoft\office and see what number if any is left there? Can I ask why you need to know (and why you don't)?
    LVL 38

    Assisted Solution

    I thought you were looking for a method to uninstall MS Office from the command line?:
    Of course it's easy enough to say this now, but perhaps you should have checked first before doing that ;-)

    Perhaps some items were left over, such as the application user template files, eg.

    C:\Documents and Settings\YourUserName\Application Data\Microsoft\PowerPoint\PPT11.pcb
    (That's a PowerPoint Version 11 template, ie. Office 2003).

    C:\Documents and Settings\Bill\Application Data\Microsoft\Office\
    (Any *.pip files may tell you the version eg. Word11.pip, Excel11.pip)

    Any left-over folders on the Start Menu? eg:
    C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\
    C:\Documents and Settings\YourUserName\Start Menu\Programs\<Office Folders>

    Any "OPAxx.dat" or "OPAxx.bak" files here (where xx = version number)?:
    C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Microsoft\OFFICE\DATA\

    Start the Systems Information tool in "History" view by typing the following command into the Start Menu's Run field:
    msinfo32 /pch
    Wait until it loads and then check the "Software Environment" category for any clues.  There probably won't be anything there, so use the "View" menu and change it to "Current System History" and wait for it to load fully.
    The last categories are usually "Office" related ones and may have persisted.  Although you may have had eg. Office 2003 installed, it may also show an "Office 2007 Applications" category below the 2003 or even 2002 categories.  This is because some updates and patches for earlier versions are to bring some of the components up to date with newer versions.  You should see a "Can't Collect Information" message in the right-hand pane, but in general the categories for the version that are the most populated with sub-categories would probably be the version that was installed.

    Do a search for any folders named "MSOCache" and, if found, look through the sub-folders, eg.
    The Windows Installer caches the setup files for later versions of MS Office in such a folder, and you may find an *.MSI file that has the version number in the file name, eg.
    C:\MSOCache\All Users\90000409-6000-11D3-8CFE-0150048383C9\PRO11.MSI
    (where "PRO" could be "STD" or some other acronym that designates the particular product release).
    Or there may be sub-folders with the version number, eg.
    C:\MSOCache\All Users\90000409-6000-11D3-8CFE-0150048383C9\FILES\PFILES\MSOFFICE\OFFICE11\

    Do a search on the drive where Office was installed for files named *office*.txt

    You are looking for the log file of the original MS Office setup.  The normal name created is "Microsoft Office xxxx Setup(????).txt" (where xxxx is the year), so perhaps even searching for  *office*setup*.txt   may get a faster result.  Somehow I doubt if the original log file will still be on your system, because all these cleanup utilities (including Windows own "cleanmgr.exe" will probably have deleted it.

    As mentioned earlier, there may be left-over folders such as:
    C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\MEDIA\OFFICE11\
    C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\OFFICE11\
    If there is also a folder:
    C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\OFFICE12\
    then look and try to figure out if any leftover files relate to updates rather than those installed by the main MS Office version that was installed.  It may not be obvious, but a very general guide would be that if there are left-over folders, then the key most densely populated with sub-folders would have been the main Office version.
    C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Templates\THEMES11\

    Open the folder:
    Right-Click on each of the *.MSI files in there and choose "Properties".  The "Summary" tab should show "Microsoft Office 200?" if the *.msi file was left after the uninstallation.  You may see the details if you get popup properties when you mouse-over files, or if you change the "View" in that folder to "Tiles".
    Note, these *.MSI files are the ones cached during the original setup and are given random names.

    Open the folder:
    and look for the names of the MS Office Executables in the names of the *.PF files, eg. "".
    COPY the file out to another folder, eg. C:\TEST and then open the file in Notepad.  The easiest way is with the command:

    notepad c:\test\

    That prevents the possibility of leaving the "always open with" box checked when doing an "Open With".

    Once opened, use the Edit > Find function and type in the double-spaced word " O F F I C E " (without the quotes).  If you get a find where it shows the two digit version number eg. " \ O F F I C E 1 1 \ " then press F3 to "Find Next" and look for further instances.  That would be a good indication that you had version 11 ie. Word 2003 installed.  As a further confirmation, search for " W O R D " and see if you get results for eg. " \ W O R D 1 1 . p i p \ " or similar.

    If you had "System Restore" monitoring the drive on which MS Office was installed, then you can list the restore points that have been saved.  Whether or not it will show any reference to the original installation of MS Office will depend on how long you have had it installed on that system, because only a set amount of space is reserved and old restore points are kicked out in favour of new ones when that space is filled.

    I have attached a *.VBS (Visual Basic Script) written by Ramesh Srinivasan - and detailed on this page:

    The file is uploaded as a *.TXT file.  Save it somewhere like your Desktop and rename it, chaning the *.TXT extension to .VBS and accept the warnings about changing file types.  Right-Click the new *.vbs file and choose "Open with Command Prompt".  After a short delay it will populate a new Notepad window with a list of System Restore Points.  This file (ListSR.txt) will have been created in the same folder as the *.vbs file.

    Hopefully this helps, but as rorya asked above, I'm curious to know why you would first need a command (or batch file) to uninstall MS Office, and now have the need to know what version you just zapped.

    LVL 38

    Expert Comment

    I believe that this question contains some pretty good information that could be of assistance to other members searching for answers at some later stage, and would therefore be a shame to have it deleted.  More to the point, I took quite some time to prepare an answer, and the combination of suggestions made by myself and murgroup's comment ID: 24239077 I am sure would have provided the answer to the question.  Unfortunately murgroup beat rorya to the same registry key suggestion  and answered it more fully.

    What about splitting the points?

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