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Best place to place SBS 2008 page file? What size should it be?

I would like to move the page file from the C: drive of our SBS 2008 server.  But, I'm not sure of the best place to move it to.  In Harry B's SBS 2008 Blueprint Book, on page 5-14, he recommends leaving 400 MB on the C: partition.  I have no issue with that, but I want to know where I should put the other page file, given our configuration:
2 RAIDS - RAID 1 has C: and other E: (245GB) partition. RAID 5 (Data) has one partition (F:) of 2.72TB.  Server has 16GB physical memory.
So, should I move the page file to the other RAID (F:) or place it on the E: partition on the RAID 1? How large should I make the swap file in the new location?
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StewartTechnologies
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StewartTechnologies
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Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
That recommendation comes by me BTW. ;)

We use RAID 10 arrays on our SBS 2008 boxes due to the extra read intensity which is where RAID 5 can be a let down.

The configuration in the book is as follows:
 + 320GB x 4 in RAID 10 for 640GB (I mistakenly had RAID 01)
 + 75GB OS
 + 25GB Swap File
 + 540GB NetworkData (balance).

We saddle the Swap File between the two partitions in a similar fashion as *BSD and *NIX setups do. This gives us optimal performance for the swap file as it keeps things contigious. This is found just above Figure 3-8 in the book.

For your config, if you can shrink the OS partition and place a partition on your RAID 1 for the swap file.

Philip
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StewartTechnologiesAuthor Commented:
I thank you for your feedback, Philip and appreciate the 'source' update!  In my configuration, could I leave the OS partition (C) as it, and place the swap file on E: (remainder of RAID 1)? I had moved the log files for Exch to E:, to separate them from the database files (and other shares) on F, but I could relocate those, if it would help the swap file.  Thank you!
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Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
We keep the Exchange data structures in their default location. Too many disaster recoveries where they were somewhere else and not in good shape.

How big is the OS partition? You could remove E:, expand C: if it will allow you to leaving 30GB or so to create the S: for your Swap File.

Philip
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StewartTechnologiesAuthor Commented:
Philip -  I can adjust the partitions to create a 25GB page file on it's own partition. This partition would still be on the RAID 1, unless you suggest it go on the RAID 5.  Also, in the book example, which follows your above recommendations, that server has 8GB RAM. Our server has 16GB. Should I create the pagefile partition larger than 25GB?  Thank you.
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Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
RAID 1 would be better as the swap file requires a good amount of read/write activity.

Here is some good reading on the swap file from the Windows Server Performance Team:

http://blogs.technet.com/askperf/archive/2009/04/14/managing-the-system-managed-page-file.aspx
http://blogs.technet.com/askperf/archive/2007/12/14/what-is-the-page-file-for-anyway.aspx

Philip
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StewartTechnologiesAuthor Commented:
Possibly, I should add another fast(er) drive to this server, outside of both RAIDS, just for the swap file?
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StewartTechnologiesAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your help.  We have a couple happy SBS 2008 servers in deployment now.
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