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Which proccess is taking my memory?

Hi Experts,

I have a server that has 8GB of RAM.  In the task manager I can see under the physical memory (K) 8385132 so I am sure that the server see the entire memory (in computer properties I do see 8GB).
In the Physical memory (K) available I see 100000  (around 100MB).

I am looking in the perfmon and in the task manager but when I adds up all the memory of all process I dont get to such high number (only around 2GB) so who is taking my memory?!?!?
Thanks in advance,
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dpatel_team
Asked:
dpatel_team
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1 Solution
 
MightySWCommented:
Hi,

Is this 2003 server standard or enterprise?

Check the Boot.ini file for the /PAE switch.

Can you post a screen shot of your task manager?

Thanks
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dpatel_teamAuthor Commented:
Yes its 2003 Enterprise and I do have the /PAE switch

attach is the task manager.

performance.JPG
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MightySWCommented:
I would say that your page file is way too large.  Why is it 16 gigs?

Also, take a look at this to properly set your pagefile:
http://www.petri.co.il/pagefile_optimization.htm

Can you sort your processes and show me that window.  You can blank out the names of the processes if you like.  Just want to see what is taking up all of the memory and crossing into the page file.  Looks suspiciously like a database.
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MightySWCommented:
sort by memory usage and then be sure to add another column for virtual memory size, select view, select columns and check virtual memory size.
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dpatel_teamAuthor Commented:
Hi,

Thanks for the fast respond. The page file is accoridng to Microsoft (and petri) recommendation its set to 12GB (not 16 GB as you mention).
I have attached screenhsot of the page file configuration and a screenshot of the first page of the proccess from the taskmanager. You can the 20 proccess that take the most memory lets say that the first 20 proccess are around 1GB and all the rest 120 proccess (140 procces in the machine) are taking 5MB  so another  0.5-1GB
So where is the rest of the memory?

taskmanager.JPG
Pagefile.JPG
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MightySWCommented:
I think that you need to use perfmon to get a better reading on when your memory is peaking.  Looks like the server may just need a reboot as you said the numbers just do not add up.  
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lnkevinCommented:
What version of your Windows 2003? Standard or Enterprise?
Did you set /PAE in your boot.ini to allow Windows to use all physical memory?

Keep in mind if you run Windows 03 standard version, you can only allocate 4GB of memory at max. For Enterprise, you can go up to 32GB, but /PAE needs to be specified in boot.ini.
This rule does not apply on Windows 64 bit. 64 bit OS can always allocate 32GB and plus.

K
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lnkevinCommented:
Sorry I misread the first post.

K
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dpatel_teamAuthor Commented:
Hi all,
I found the solution.
Well thank you all for recommendation about the task manager  but as I mention in my original post I am familiar with the task manager and I am familiar with the performance counters.
But the only way to find out how much memory the SQL server takes is by using the counter : SQL Server: Memory Manager/Total server memory (KB).

The task manager information and the performance counter : process/private Byte will not show you the real number.
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MightySWCommented:
I think that I did suggest that you use perfmon and look for a database or memory when associated with a database.  

Can you please close this question?  Looks like you are good to go.

Nice job.
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