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How do you configure ESX 3.02 to work with multiple default gateways?

Posted on 2009-05-05
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Last Modified: 2012-05-06
Hello,

I am working with VMware's ESX 3.02 Servers.  I have 4 in a cluster, and their respective IP's are 192.168.7.240-243, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0, and gateway is 192.168.7.5.  In my environment, I have VLANs dedicated to production (192.168.7.X), and Staging (192.168.203.X and 192.168.13.X).  

I am trying to get a VM Guest OS on our staging domain to work properly.  I have taken a second NIC from one of the ESX Hosts, and ran the CAT 5 from the VLAN port for the 192.168.203.X network to it.  When I tried to create an IP address for the NIC in the networking area I can create one for the 192.168.203.X network, however it will not let me have multiple default gateways.  Trying to make it work with 192.168.203.X is not working this way.

My second attempt, I left the VLAN 203 cable in the NIC, and configured the NIC for 192.168.7.X IP, and left the default gateway 192.168.7.5.  When I configured the VM on the Staging NIC, it would allow me to place it on the 192.168.203.X network; however, it will only communicate with that network.  It will not ping anything on the 192.168.7.X or 192.168.13.X networks.  

This is where I am stuck.  I need to know how to properly configure the ESX server so that the VM will communicate with all of the networks in my datacenter.  If you have any experience with this please let me know what I need to do.  
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Question by:ADX39655
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Expert Comment

by:vmwarun - Arun
ID: 24311378
The vSwitches that get bound to a Physical NIC on your Host can see multiple VLAN Traffic if the cable is connected to a Trunk Port on the Physical Switch.

For example, if you connect a cable from vSwitch1 to a Port on the physical Switch that can only see 192.168.7.X Subnet's Traffic then the VMs bound to that specific vSwitch1 can have IPs only in the range of 192.168.7.X Subnet.
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Author Comment

by:ADX39655
ID: 24311403
The physical servers on the 192.168.7.X network can communicate with the 192.168.13.X and 192.168.203.X networks. The problem only occurs when I am testing with this single VM that I have tried to put on the Staging network.  I assigned it the IP address of 192.168.203.45, netmask 255.255.255.0, and gateway 192.168.203.1, which is correct for that network.

The VM has no problem communicating with anything on the 192.168.203.0 network, but no machines from the 192.168.13.0 or 192.168.7.0 networks can ping it, and it cannot ping other networks.  The physical server that I converted attached to that same port group for that network can communicate with all of the networks.
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Quori earned 750 total points
ID: 24311942
Sounds like you are using access ports to the ESX host instead of a trunk - might want to fix this.

I am assuming that 192.168.203.1 is the IP address of a SVI on the switch, which has ip routing enabled, right?
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Assisted Solution

by:vmwarun - Arun
vmwarun - Arun earned 750 total points
ID: 24312076
When creating the vSwitch did you provide any VLAN ID to make the vSwitch VLAN Aware ?
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Author Comment

by:ADX39655
ID: 24318227
Thanks for the help, I was finally able to solve this problem.

My issue related to the default gateway within the VM itself.  I had set it to 192.168.203.1, which is the correct gateway for that VLAN...however, I resolved the issue by changing the default gateway to 192.168.7.249, which is what I set the IP address of the service console for vSwitch1.  Once I made this change I was able to ping all of the networks successfully.
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