GDI Leaks

Is there tool I can use to track the source of GDI memory leaks?  I am using WinXP, and have a lot of programs running.
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mraeryceosAsked:
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KenneniahConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Unfortunately there is no GDI related column for DLLs. The only reason I brought it up is sometimes a memory leak and a GDI leak go hand in hand, so if you see one DLL using a lot of memory it might point at least in the right direction.

Unfortunately if it is in the explorer.exe process, it's very very hard to track down. I'm not aware of any tool that can show GDI objects for the child DLLs. The most likely culprits are applications that run in the systray, context menu addons (things that add to the right-click menus), toolbars and/or taskbar addons/replacements, and programs that modify Windows XP themes.  It boils down to a process of elimination, which of course is a pain :(
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mraeryceosAuthor Commented:
This doesn't help, because I think it is for debugging a program.  I have a dozen background programs running, and want to find the offender.
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spamsterCommented:
Ahh, misunderstood :)
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KenneniahCommented:
Task Manager. Open it as normal, then on the Processes tab go to View | Select Columns.
Place a check next to USER Objects and GDI Objects and hit OK.
Then look for process that seem to be using an excessive amount.
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mraeryceosAuthor Commented:
I have a program called TaskInfo, which is what clued me in on which program is using too much GDI.  The problem is that it is Explorer.exe, so it isn't very helpful.  I think it may be something that is riding on top of Explorer, so I need something a little more sophisticated than Task Manager.  In Task Manager, Explorer is only using 21MB.  But TaskInfo has it using 2000+ GDI objects.  Sometimes it goes higher than 6000, at which time my system is using close to 10000, and I have to close some apps and restart.
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KenneniahCommented:
Then Process Explorer from Technet.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx
Same thing, View | Select Columns.
It will show Child processes under Explorer.exe if there are any.
Most likely when it's in Explorer.exe it's items in the Systray (area next to the clock).
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mraeryceosAuthor Commented:
Ok, I got the GDI column showing in Process Explorer, but everything is a child of Explorer!  Take a look at attached.  Don't laugh.  I like all those programs.  Just need to find out which has the GDI leak.  Right now, things are going well, but eventually I will have probs.
process-explorer.jpg
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mraeryceosAuthor Commented:
Is there not a tool for finding GDI Leaks related to Explorer?
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KenneniahCommented:
Well yes, since Explorer.exe is the Windows shell most processes will be child processes of it. 2000ish isn't uncommon, but when it hits the 6000+ range you mentioned, Process Explorer should be able to point out the biggest users. There isn't much in explorer.exe itself that's likely, with the possible exception of .dll based shell extensions.
Unfortunately I'm not aware of a way to see the GDI objects of each individual DLL file. You can however select explorer.exe, and in the bottom window of Process Explorer have it display the dlls in use. Under View | Select Columns you can go to the DLL tab and check Mapped Size, WS Total Bytes etc. to get an idea of memory usage of each.
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mraeryceosAuthor Commented:
Which of those columns is for GDI?  How does memory use relate?
explorer-threads.jpg
dlls.jpg
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mraeryceosAuthor Commented:
"Detect and Plug GDI Leaks in Your Code with Two Powerful Tools for Windows XP"
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc188782.aspx
I found an executable within the download.  I ran it and it instantaneously crashed my system, with a win32k.sys blue screen of death.
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mraeryceosAuthor Commented:
I found the software causing the problem by the process of elimination.
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