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Setting up hard drive arangement and partitions for office

Posted on 2009-05-06
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I am setting up computers for an office. I am trying to figure out the best way to set up the partitions on the hard drive.  All of the machines  have one hard drive.

Should I set up just one large C: partition and make users store all of their data in their profile.  would the profile getting corrupt be an issue?  I could then use roaming profiles, so everything will be backed up on the server?

Should I set up the C: partition and a D: partition and keep the data on the C: drive?  That way I can reinstall the OS if needed and have all of the data on the D: drive?
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Question by:ryan80
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by:datagutten
ID: 24318226
I like to store all data on the server. If you want something stored locally, i recommend you to make two partitions as you suggest.
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dbrunton earned 500 total points
ID: 24318513
Should I set up just one large C: partition and make users store all of their data in their profile.  would the profile getting corrupt be an issue?

Profiles can get corrupt but if the data is backed up that's not a problem.  Profiles can be recreated if necessary.

I could then use roaming profiles, so everything will be backed up on the server?

Yes.  Just make sure they use My documents.

Should I set up the C: partition and a D: partition and keep the data on the C: drive?

I think you mean the data on D: and the OS on C:

That way I can reinstall the OS if needed and have all of the data on the D: drive?

It is nice to do it this way but I wouldn't bother if this is an office unless the user is an extreme power user.

What I would recommend is getting the base computer setup and all applications installed and the system totally patched.  Then clone it or Ghost this drive to a backup medium like an external USB hard drive.  

If the computer drive crashes you can reinstall your drive from the image on the USB drive.  When the user reconnects to the server all their data gets copied back down to the hard disk.
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