View all IP addresses currently in use on a Windows network?

Too frequently, we are entering new client environments with a wide variety of IP addresses assigned.  While it is easy enough to view the windows network, the difficulty lies in identifying all of the other IP addresses in use (printers, routers, wireless devices...).

Is there a windows command line to list all current (in use) ip addresses on the internal network?
nohamcmAsked:
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0791882310Connect With a Mentor Commented:
not sure... but i use angry ip and just scan through the range that we use.. it list all active ip addresses including routers, the firewall, printers, switchs.. servers.. clients...

http://www.angryziber.com/w/Home
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joefreedomCommented:
I would agree with the expert above using angry IP, I like to use a utility called nmap in my environment.

I'm sure you are familar with the windows command ping, that is about the only windows command I am familiar with that would allow you to verify if an IP is open (however if a device is configured not to reply to ICMP requests then the ping command is worthless anyways...this is why using a software utility such as angry IP or nmap can be valuable)
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craigothyCommented:
Here is a free tool from solarwinds.......
http://www.solarwinds.com/products/freetools/ip_address_tracker/
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lightcom1Commented:
There is no windows command line that shows a list of ip's on a network. However the tool i use  is Overlook's fing tool.  Download and install it, it ouputs to command line in windows. You can tell it to output its results in various formats, such as html, text. I use it to create a dump file that i can open with notepad or word. It is extremely fast and free.
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The--CaptainCommented:
Ping is by no means worthless for discovery, even if ICMP is blocked on the remote machine.  Ping will trigger an ARP request for the IP in question, and you can then examine the ARP tables to determine if the IP exists.

nmap is just as "useless", but examining the ARP tables after an nmap sweep will reveal the used IPs.

Cheers,
-Jon
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nohamcmAuthor Commented:
Assigning points to the first response.  Several of the tools cited all work quite well.
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