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using same catlog after exporting DB to new 11g

Posted on 2009-05-06
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Last Modified: 2012-05-06
Hello Gurus:
the situation  is like the following a client with a DB on 10g r1 they need to upgrade to 11g;
as you may know there are multible problems trying to that VIA DBUA ot manual upgrade specially and the TIMEZONE issues are not fixed and are not availble for this windows 10gr1.
we are thinking of using export or datapump as they will save a lot of time.
but after doing so how do we reatach the new DB with the old rman catalog .
and is this a good practice or not ;
will usinf set DBID to the same like the origianl DB and craeting it with the same sid fool the catalog into thinking it is the same .
i do not not think so because of the control file !!!
please help

thanks
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Question by:it-rex
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LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:mrjoltcola
ID: 24320818
>>we are thinking of using export or datapump as they will save a lot of time.
>>but after doing so how do we reattach the new DB with the old rman catalog .

It is not required to use the same SID or DBID, essentially it become a new database.

>>will usinf set DBID to the same like the origianl DB and craeting it with the same sid fool the >>catalog into thinking it is the same .

Why do you want to try this? I don't think this will work unless you reset database and resync, which might make the old backups stop working, and could risk getting your RMAN catalog confused (I think).

Why not just use a new database, rather than try to fake it. What is to be gained by keeping the old DBID? If you tried to restore from past incarnations, you would have to upgrade the database in place again, so you'd be back where you started.

I recommend creating a brand new database to do the import and catalog it freshly as a unique database, that way you preserve the catalog for the old db.

Technically I think there is way to accomplish what you suggested, but I think you are asking for trouble.
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LVL 11

Author Comment

by:it-rex
ID: 24321332
Ok I have this Q from Managamnet:
what are the bad side effects for creating a new DB and losing the history with rman catalog????
thanks
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mrjoltcola earned 1500 total points
ID: 24321701
No history will be lost if you use new DBID. History WILL be lost if you try your proposal, because you cannot retain the existing catalog info, you'll have to recatalog by unregistering.

Your proposal:

You create a new database with 11g, then perform an import. Import is irrelevant, but the new database is relevant, it has a new controlfile, empty of RMAN history and the controlfile is not compatible with the RMAN catalog for the old db. It is a different database! You cannot just resync it, things are out of sync (SCNs, etc.) You have to unregister and reregister, so what happens when you do that, all RMAN history for that DB is gone. The only option is to recatalog backupsets into the controlfile, and reregister, which starts the history over. RMAN gets its data from the controlfile, not vice-versa.

Oracle even recommends that you unregister/register if you had to recreate the controlfile of the existing database, so your scenario is even more severe. I don't think Oracle will recommend this. Since it is an 11g database, I see no advantage to doing this because you really cannot use the old backupsets unless you reinstall the old binaries, or you decide to restore and upgrade in place.

So the question is, what advantage is there to keeping the history of the 10g linked to the 11g, even if it were possible. Its a _new_ database.

If you create a new database, then you preserve the old database DBID in the RMAN catalog, and can always quickly restore from the old DB separately. The new DBID gets its own history. No history is lost.

The only way I see this as a viable option is if Oracle added support to push catalog info *into* the controlfile, but for whatever reason, they do not provide that, so I take back my original statement about "it may be possible." I don't think it will work if you try it.

I think if management thinks it is that important, then you need to forget the export/import and upgrade the database in place, which will retain the controlfile and allow resync.
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LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:mrjoltcola
ID: 24321712
And remember, you don't have to rename the database to catalog the new DBID, as long as you use a new DBID, RMAN will track it separately.
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LVL 48

Expert Comment

by:schwertner
ID: 24322886
Using RMAN possibly you will run in troubles.
RMAN is a complex program product and is version dependent as every program product
and also there are more the enough bugs.

So I will recommend to use the classic Export/Import way.
Why classic? Because Data Pump doesn't work in Oracle 10g Release 1.
But if it works on your installation - use it.

Try to migrate application by application.
This is the best way migrating from version to version.
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