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How do I move mssqlsystemresource to a new location?

Posted on 2009-05-07
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Last Modified: 2012-05-06
A previous DBA at my company installed three instances of SQL 2005 on a server. One of the instances is located on a local drive (D) and the other two were put on a NAS drive (G). Since the databases on the G drive were very small, I wanted to move them to the local drive to make better use of my SAN. I was able to move all of the system databases and user databases to the D drive with no problem. However, for both instances that were on the G drive, I still have mssqlsystemresource.mdf and mssqlsystemresource.ldf stuck on there. I made a backup of these files and tried to delete the original from the G drive but they were in use, still, by SQL Server. I was able to delete them after stopping all SQL Server services, but they wouldn't restart after. So, I copied my backup over and got everything working again.

My question: How can I move these files off of my G drive and onto my local D drive?

Many thanks!
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Question by:recrawfordadmin
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by:RiteshShah
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by:Kanchipuramdeena
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by:recrawfordadmin
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Neither of your suggestions were helpful. I'm still not having any luck whatsoever getting these files moved. Can anyone offer another suggestion?
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Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3] earned 500 total points
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short answer: you cannot.
the file MUST be located as indicated:
Physical Properties of Resource 

The physical file names of the Resource database are mssqlsystemresource.mdf and mssqlsystemresource.ldf. These files are located in <drive>:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL10.<instance_name>\MSSQL\Binn\.

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