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Changing the WHERE clause does not return what I am expecting

Posted on 2009-05-08
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Last Modified: 2012-05-06
With the help of Experts I finally got the following query working where it returned 1 record for each employer with a count of active employees, paidout employees and forfeiture employees.  Data set returned contains 3 rows with 5 columns.  So far so good until I discovered that my query for active employees was incorrect.  In the current query, the WHERE clause is Employees.EmployeeStatus='ACTIVE'.  I need to change the query to be WHERE Employees.PlanStatus<>'PAID OUT' AND Employees.PlanStatus<>'FORFEITURE'.  I thought this would be a simple change but when I made it, the data set returned contains 5 rows with 5 columns.  The one employer has an employee with a PlanStatus = "PAID OUT" and another Employee with a PlanStatus = "FORFEITURE".  As soon as I change the = to <> or add the second condition to the WHERE clause, more than one record is returned for the employer that has employees with different plan status.  Any insight into this problem would be appreciated.


SELECT a.EmployerName, a.EmployerID, b.ActiveEmployees, c.PaidOutEmployees, d.ForfeitureEmployees
FROM ((employers AS a LEFT JOIN (SELECT Count(Employees.EmployeeStatus) AS ActiveEmployees, Employees.EmployerID FROM Employees WHERE Employees.EmployeeStatus='ACTIVE' GROUP BY Employees.EmployerID, Employees.EmployeeStatus)  AS b ON a.EmployerID=b.EmployerID) LEFT JOIN (SELECT Count(Employees.PlanStatus) AS PaidOutEmployees, Employees.EmployerID FROM Employees WHERE Employees.PlanStatus='PAID OUT' GROUP BY Employees.EmployerID, Employees.PlanStatus)  AS c ON b.EmployerID=c.EmployerID) LEFT JOIN (SELECT Count(Employees.PlanStatus) AS ForfeitureEmployees, Employees.EmployerID FROM Employees WHERE Employees.PlanStatus='FORFEITURE' GROUP BY Employees.EmployerID, Employees.PlanStatus)  AS d ON c.EmployerID=d.EmployerID;

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Question by:dyarosh
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2 Comments
 
LVL 6

Accepted Solution

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RPCIT earned 2000 total points
ID: 24338089
the below should do what you wanted.. it should always return the number of rows that are in your employers table..

I changed your group by clauses, and changed the joins to all join to a.

Hope this helps
SELECT a.EmployerName, a.EmployerID, b.ActiveEmployees, c.PaidOutEmployees, d.ForfeitureEmployees
FROM ((employers AS a 
LEFT JOIN (	SELECT Count(Employees.PlanStatus) AS ActiveEmployees, Employees.EmployerID 
			FROM Employees 
			WHERE Employees.PlanStatus <> 'PAID OUT' AND Employees.PlanStatus <> 'FORFEITURE' 
			GROUP BY Employees.EmployerID)  AS b 
					ON a.EmployerID=b.EmployerID) 
LEFT JOIN (	SELECT Count(Employees.PlanStatus) AS PaidOutEmployees, Employees.EmployerID 
			FROM Employees 
			WHERE Employees.PlanStatus='PAID OUT' 
			GROUP BY Employees.EmployerID)  AS c 
					ON a.EmployerID=c.EmployerID) 
LEFT JOIN (	SELECT Count(Employees.PlanStatus) AS ForfeitureEmployees, Employees.EmployerID 
			FROM Employees 
			WHERE Employees.PlanStatus='FORFEITURE'
			GROUP BY Employees.EmployerID)  AS d 
					ON a.EmployerID=d.EmployerID;

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Expert Comment

by:ToddBeaulieu
ID: 24338121
Personally, I find this type of left outer join nesting confusing and hard to maintain. Try figuring this out a month from now when you've moved onto other things.

Of course, when writing Sql, there are many factors to consider, especially the amount of data and frequency fo the query. In other words, you should always evaluate (and re-evaluate as data and load increases) approaches to make sure they're acceptably efficient.

I'd simplify the query using subqueries, which makes it super easy to tweak them individually without harming your eyeballs.
SELECT  c.EmployerName,
        c.EmployerID, 
        ActiveEmployees = (SELECT count(*) FROM Employees WHERE EmployerID = c.EmployerID and PlanStatus != 'FORFEITURE' and PlanStatus != 'PAID OUT'),
        PaidOutEmployees = (SELECT count(*) FROM Employees WHERE EmployerID = c.EmployerID and PlanStatus == 'PAID OUT'),
        ForfeitureEmployees = (SELECT count(*) FROM Employees WHERE EmployerID = c.EmployerID and PlanStatus == 'FORFEITURE')
FROM    employers c

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