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What is the difference between GPO Computer Configuration and User Configuration?

Posted on 2009-05-09
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Can someone please explain to me what is the difference between Group policy "Computer Settings" and "User Settings", as most of the stuff is identical.

How to decide where to apply settings?

Some specific rules I should abide when setting GPOs?

Thanks.
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Question by:mrmut
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DTAHARLEV earned 2000 total points
ID: 24346201
you create an OU, which may have computers under it, or users. You then assign a Group Policy to the OU. It will apply to everything under it, using computer settings to computers under it and user settings to users under it. for example, if you have a policy to set user jdoe's wallpaper to "\\server\share\image.bmp", this will take effect on all machines jdoe logs on to.

If you have a computer policy set to not allow USB devices, anyone who logs on to this machine -- jdoe or anyone else -- won't be able to do it.

What if they conflict? Well, the way by which they're determined is pretty complex, including OUs, Sites, and so on. I'd start here:

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/techinfo/overview/gpintro.mspx

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by:mrmut
ID: 24346233
Thanks!
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