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why is logging into a workstation slow when I do not point the DNS to the server

I am having issues with the router and server not working well together.  The router is handling DHCP but I have the server setup to run DNS.  It seems to be creating a problem between the two devices.  I would like to copy my config here and have someone take a look at it.  I do not know where to find it.  I am new at windows server slow please be very descriptive.
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riverraid
Asked:
riverraid
2 Solutions
 
briandunkleCommented:
Does the server have a static address? You really don't want a DNS server having a dynamic address. Actually, it shouldn't even work...
If it's static, is it in the right range?
In any case, in a Windows domain situation, the domain controller pretty much has to handle DNS as well. Or one, if you have more than one DC.
Also, the server needs to point to itself for DNS, with a setting to look somewhere else for unresolved addresses. It needs to be the primary DNS server for your domain, though.
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riverraidAuthor Commented:
it is a static IP address.  I just set it up to point to itself now.  I am still not sure that my DNS config is correct.
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Mal OsborneAlpha GeekCommented:
DNS in a domain environment has to point to the server. The server should have a static IP. The router can still act as a DHCP server, but not DNS.  Configure the router's DHCP server to set the clients up with the servers IP for DNS, and it's own IP as a default gateway.
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riverraidAuthor Commented:
ok, will do.  How can I verify that DNS is configured properly?
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automationstationCommented:
On one of client machines, Start | Run | CMD | Enter... type ipconfig /all... Enter. The workstations should have the internal (private ip address) DNS server listed.
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briandunkleCommented:
On the server, go into the control panel --> administrative tools --> DNS, right click on the server name, and choose properties. On the "forwarders" tab, click on "all other DNS domains", and enter the IP of your upstream DNS server (from your ISP) so it knows where to look for stuff outside your domain.

To test it, log in to one of the workstations, do start --> run and enter "nslookup", then put in the name of your domain controller and see if it gives you the right address. After that, put in cnn.com or something and see if it can resolve that as well. If so, DNS is good to go.
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