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How do I mount a Xen disk image to extract files from it?

How do I mount a Xen disk image to extract files from it?

I have successfully mounted 1 Xen disk image using this command:  
mount -o loop /xen-disk /mount-point

The second Xen disk image I am trying to mount using the same command gives me the following error:  mount: you must specify the filesystem type

I  have tried Ext3 Ext 2 and auto, to no avail.

If i specify Ext3 it suggests to run dmesg | tail, the output is as below:
# dmesg | tail
hfs: unable to find HFS+ superblock
hfs: unable to find HFS+ superblock
hfs: unable to find HFS+ superblock
VFS: Can't find ext3 filesystem on dev loop0.
VFS: Can't find an ext2 filesystem on dev loop0.
hfs: unable to find HFS+ superblock
hfs: unable to find HFS+ superblock
hfs: unable to find HFS+ superblock
hfs: unable to find HFS+ superblock
VFS: Can't find ext3 filesystem on dev loop0.

]# uname -a
Linux 2.6.18-92.el5 #1 SMP Tue Jun 10 18:51:06 EDT 2008 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

Any ideas?


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medfacit
Asked:
medfacit
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1 Solution
 
0renCommented:
did you had a clean umount on that image ?
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medfacitAuthor Commented:
Possibly not, the image was running over an nfs export that was flakey and had to be shut down.  Also cant bring it back up to shut down cleanly either.  

Are there tools that can be run on the file to fix this?
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0renCommented:
im not sure

you can try dd it into a file and then try to mount
if it doesnt work use the tool dd_rescue
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0renCommented:
also try this one
mount -v -s -o ro,loop /xen-disk /mount-point
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0renCommented:
another option:

losetup /dev/loop1 your_zen_disk
e2fsck -f /dev/loop1

and then try to mount
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medfacitAuthor Commented:
Thanks will try these out.
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Todd MummertCommented:

If this is a raw disk image, and not just a single partition, then you have to specify the offset of the partition as well.  Use fdisk, or sfdisk, to determine the partition offset.   For example:

root@ghostrider:~# sfdisk -d disk.raw
# partition table of disk.raw
unit: sectors

disk.raw1 : start=       63, size= 41190597, Id=83, bootable
disk.raw2 : start= 41190660, size=   738990, Id= 5
disk.raw3 : start=        0, size=        0, Id= 0
disk.raw4 : start=        0, size=        0, Id= 0
disk.raw5 : start= 41190723, size=   738927, Id=82

From sfdisk above, the linux partition can be found at the start of sector 63, sectors are 512 bytes.   For fdisk,  run 'fdisk -lu disk.raw'

  Now, run the mount command as:

root@ghostrider:~# mount -o loop,offset=$((63*512)),ro disk.raw mnt-point

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medfacitAuthor Commented:
Hi All,

Thanks for all of your help.

The disk needed to be recovered.

Solution was as follows:

losetup -o 1151539200 /dev/loop2 /xen_disk
fsck /dev/loop2
mount /dev/loop2 /mnt

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medfacitAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your help!
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