How do I grant a group of uses the rights to install apps on their computers (Active Directory)

Posted on 2009-05-11
Medium Priority
Last Modified: 2012-08-13
I am simply looking for the proper way to allow a group of domain users (using Active Directory running on Windows Server 2003) the rights to install applications on their local PCs. Their elevated rights should only be local, I don't want to grant them any additional access to the network resources.

The majority of users do not have this privilege, which is as it should be, but I'd like to let some people install things without having to have me come do it for them.

Question by:Sootah
LVL 18

Assisted Solution

flyingsky earned 800 total points
ID: 24358783
add that AD group into local admin group
LVL 15

Accepted Solution

zelron22 earned 1200 total points
ID: 24358883
It depends on whether or not it's okay for those users to have admin access on that group of machines, or whether you only want each user to have access on their own machine.

If you create an AD group, add all of these special users, and then add that group to each machine's local admin group, then they'll all have admin rights on each of those machines.  

Another option is to add them individually to their own machine's administrators group.


Featured Post

Has Powershell sent you back into the Stone Age?

If managing Active Directory using Windows Powershell® is making you feel like you stepped back in time, you are not alone.  For nearly 20 years, AD admins around the world have used one tool for day-to-day AD management: Hyena. Discover why.

Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

High user turnover can cause old/redundant user data to consume valuable space. UserResourceCleanup was developed to address this by automatically deleting user folders when the user account is deleted.
The Windows Firewall provides an important layer of protection and a rich interface to configure it. Unfortunately, it lacks item level filtering. This article details my process of implementing firewall-as-code to reduce GPO bloat.
Microsoft Active Directory, the widely used IT infrastructure, is known for its high risk of credential theft. The best way to test your Active Directory’s vulnerabilities to pass-the-ticket, pass-the-hash, privilege escalation, and malware attacks …
Attackers love to prey on accounts that have privileges. Reducing privileged accounts and protecting privileged accounts therefore is paramount. Users, groups, and service accounts need to be protected to help protect the entire Active Directory …

588 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question