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WAN settings on DLink Router

I just started working at a company who fired their IT person and now we are trying to figure out how things are set up. Here is our problem: we have a security camera computer that has an IP of 192.168.2.10. We have a SMC Router which is using 192.168.2.1 and is the DCHP server. Now here is the tricky part, the old IT person put in another router (DLink) in a separate room but is just using it as a network hub to connect a few other computers to the internet (some wired, some wireless). Since that Dlink router was put in place we cannot connect to the security camera computer to check the cameras. When I checked the settings in the DLink Router it says:
WAN
Connection Type: DHCP Client
QoS Engine: Active
Cable Status: Connected
Network Status: Established
IP Address: 192.168.2.10
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.2.1
Primary DNS Server: 192.168.2.1
Secondary DNS Sever: 0.0.0.0

LAN
IP Address: 192.168.0.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
DHCP Server: Enabled

Any suggestions on what we should do?
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champagne4amy
Asked:
champagne4amy
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2 Solutions
 
gilgetCommented:
hello there
you could just give the dlink router another ip adress.
configure the tcp ip settings just exactly as you wrote them, just change the ip to anotherone that is not in use.
and you should be fine!
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Pete_ZedCommented:
It looks like the WAN connection has the same IP address as the camera computer. Change the IP address of the WAN connection and you should be fine. Also disable the DHCP server on the second router as you can only have one DHCP server on the network.
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gilgetCommented:
lets say this a little better

on the dlinks WAN interface.
configure settings manually, with exact same infos as you wrote aboth, but change the IP to something else than 2.10, maybe 2.9 is free? you can launch a comman shell in windows and use the ping command to check if anything responds on an ip or not, thats how you see if it is free or not.

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GerardChiassonCommented:
Look at your .2.X subnet dhcp and find the lease range
Change the LAN address of your DLink to a .2.X subnet outside of that range
Change the DLink DHCP to a new lease range also in the .2.X subnet but not overlapping the main network.
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gilgetCommented:
i disagree with pete ZED

cause as it looks like, the DLINK acts as a real router not as a bridge.

therefore leave DHCP turned on, or your computers behind the dlink and on the dlinks wireless will not get an IP anymore, since at this moment, they get an IP from DHCP in the 192.168.0.0/24 subnet.
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GerardChiassonCommented:
Easiest:
If you don't need the router function of the dlink - turn off dhcp and move the WAN cable to a LAN port on the DLINK.
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akahanCommented:
On the DLink WAN configuration, just tell the DLink to get its IP address dynamically.  It will then be issued a WAN address via DHCP from the SMC router.

Don't turn off DHCP on the DLink router, as it has a separate subnet for the PC's connected to it, and they need to get their IP addresses from it.

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champagne4amyAuthor Commented:
OK, I am going to try to make sense of all of this. I had thought about changing the IP of the DLink to the .2.x range but wasn't sure about it. I didn't see where I could change the WAN IP. I need to keep the IPs in the .2.x range because there is a network printer that is in that range that has an IP of 192.168.2.249. I will go through all of your suggestions and let you know which one works. Thanks for all of your help!!
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akahanCommented:
Given the additional information in your 2:52pm message, GerardChiasson offers the best solution, I think.
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champagne4amyAuthor Commented:
HIs first reply right? Not the message about switching cables and turning off dhcp.
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akahanCommented:
No, his last reply, the one about switching cables and turning off DHCP.
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GerardChiassonCommented:
Because your :52 comment implied that you are accessing a network printer on the main network.  Also, IP camera's are often accessed using special software and/or on alternative TCP ports.  You would probably still have to open up a port if you still use the DLink router function.
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champagne4amyAuthor Commented:
OK. I will try switching the cables and turning off DHCP. I won't be able to test it out until mid to later this week but I will let you know how it goes. Thanks again for your replies!
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Kerem ERSOYPresidentCommented:
gilget: You are right the second DHCP is for the second network D-LINK lan so it is not conflicting with WAN side WAN

It seems that the problem is D-LINK has the same address with the cam server. So there's a conflict. I guess bot IP address es are static and the Cam Server gives-up seeng antoher system has the same IP. So You need to change one of them. Be careful to assign an IP address that is not in the DHCP pool.
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MariusSunchaserCommented:
Hi there.

Reading your post, I want to ask you why are you using that SMC router? I don't like in my network devices that complicate network structure. For instance, I would have bought an AP to handle those wireless clients instead of a router. But to work with what you got, I would use the wireless router as main router and DHCP to serve both wired and wireless clients, and take out the SMC router.

Always when designing networks, identify first what you need. Based on that, use what you have to keep things as simple as possible. I mean, why using 2 routers?
Your problem (computers in the second LAN - behind the wireless router) of course they won't see the cam, because when they search the ip of the cam, they'll find the IP of their own router, and that's no cam for sure.
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champagne4amyAuthor Commented:
It was like that when I got there. I didn't understand it myself. It is not a problem to get new hardware to simplify things. Should I just keep the SMC Router since it is back where the server and ISP modem is and then just buy a wireless access point for the other area? I still need them to be on the same IP range as the SMC so they can print to the IP printer and IP camera. Is is possible to change the IP of an access point to be on the same range as the SMC?
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GerardChiassonCommented:
Yes you can, and have to, set an IP for the access point so that you can configure and manage it.
Make sure that you use a new IP address or make a reservation for it on the SMC.
Use a tool like this to find a possible free address http://www.radmin.com/products/utilities/ipscanner.php
Replace the DLink with a small switch.
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MariusSunchaserCommented:
You have these options:
1. Keep the current configuration, but change the WAN IP of your wireless router (and make reservations in the SMC's DHCP for network devices, to prevent these problems from now on).
2. Take the SMC out of the network and configure the wireless router to server as a router and to serve wireless clients.
3. Take the wireless router out and buy an AP. Configure the IP to obtain an IP through DHCP, disable DHCP service on it, and leave the wireless clients to use the main DHCP in your network. Don't forget to make DHCP reservation for it too.
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champagne4amyAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all of your help!! I ended up putting in a SMC Access Point. Now all the computers are on the 192.168.2.x network and everything is working as it should.
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