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Coloring in Photoshop

I have attached a .jpg of a picture I would like to edit.

I need to change the picture from the current greyscale to a mix of greens.

I have also attached a low quality version of what I want the picture to look like. I have lost my high quality version and now must create a high quality one from my greyscale picture.

The larger file is the greyscale I want converted.
The smaller file is the low quality color version that I want the greyscale one to look like, only in a higher resolution.

Your help is much appreciated!!!!


Thanks,
Chris
golflinks.jpg
coursesm.jpg
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chrisglissman
Asked:
chrisglissman
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4 Solutions
 
Philip_SparkCommented:
Use the Hue/Saturation dialogue box set to colorize to get green

then magic wand the stream  and with selection active coliorize to blue
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Philip_SparkCommented:
remember to change mode to rgb first
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statler01Commented:
Make sure you're working in RGB mode, create a color layer over your background grayscale layer, and paint away!

To quickly get something close: Work in RGB mode, image-->adjustments-->hue/saturation. Click "Colorize" set hue to 117, saturation to 31, lightness to 4. (you can tweak a bit from there)
Then make new layers to paint over the river and clubhouse.
It's not exact, but will get you color quick and easy.
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alien109Commented:
Here's what I'd do.

Convert to RGB
Create a layer on top of the background
Fill with your desired color
Set the blending mode of the layer to color
Select the background layer
Tweak the levels of the back ground to push up the blacks and achieve desired effect
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chrisglissmanAuthor Commented:
Thank You Phillip and Statler!! - Sorry alien you were a tad late :( but you got 20 points anyway :)
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MerkatorCommented:
Chris,

You're going to have a hard time getting a clean high res version of your low res grayscale master. When you upscale in Photoshop (go to higher resolution), all the software can do is guess what color the added pixels are supposed to be. In other words, if you have one black pixel on the left and one white pixel on the right, when you upsample, Photoshop will add a gray pixel in between the two. This interpolation is why you get that fuzzy look when you go from low to high resolution. Conversely, going from high to low resolution is no problem, Photoshop just gets rid of pixels.

There are two ways you can approach this:

The easy way-


Open your file in Photoshop, convert from grayscale mode to RGB or CMYK (Image > Mode > RGB).
Increase the resolution (if you want) by going to Image > Image Size and changing the resolution from 72 to at whatever you need. Leave Resample Image checked and on Bicubic.

With your Brush Tool selected, and Mode set to Multiply, start painting over your gray areas in the color of your choice. Multiply mode is transparent, so you'll still be able to see the gray underneath.

Alternately, you can paint in Normal mode, but you'll lose your artwork underneath.


The hard way-

Recreate your artwork in Illustrator by Placing it on your artboard and tracing it. This will take a lot more time, but it will be cleaner, resolution independent and converted to JPEG if you need.
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statler01Commented:
I know points have already been assigned, but something occurred to me after the fact. Just for giggles:

I took your grayscale, turned it to RGB.
Then I took the small colored one, put it over the grayscale and dropped the opacity to 50% and scaled it up to match. (the opacity at 50% allowed me to get the scaling exact). I brought the opacity back to 100% after scaling, and changed the now blurry colored layer to a layer mode of "color".

Viola! Done.
golflinks.jpg
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alien109Commented:
duh - hadn't thought of that :) nice solution statler01!
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chrisglissmanAuthor Commented:
Thank You soooo much for all the help!! You guys are great!!
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MerkatorCommented:
Great call, Statler.
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