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Old Linux server about to die.....What now

Posted on 2009-05-12
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
So I have an old Dell Poweredge 1400SC with  four IDE hard drives, all setup as RAID 0.  The drives (at least one, possibly two) have been whining loudly and last night the machine crashed.  The machine runs a couple web apps and runs Linux Red Hat 7.3.  I have a full backup of the entire ROOT directory using Symantec Backup Exec with the Linux agent.  What is the best option to keep the software as-is and replace the hard drives?  I'm not a Linux guru and I basically need to somehow clone all 4 of these drives to new, fresh drives and get the server up and running again.  The machine is running again now, but it's only a matter of time before it's down again. Thanks.
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Question by:tenover
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cjl7 earned 2000 total points
ID: 24371636
1. Do a full backup
2. shutdown server
3. replace disks
4. reinstall redhat 7.3 base
5. restore full backup
6. test, verify, go live

Since you have the old disks you can always go back to them in case it doesn't work.


But if you are running "a couple of web apps" they can probably be migrated to something that has been patched this century... So I'd do something like:

1. get a new server
2. install linux of choice (RHEL5?)
3. migrate apps to new server
4. test, verify, go live
5. recycle old server

//jonas
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by:mchkorg
ID: 24372537
Use your Symantec backup, OR :
if you can put additional disks in your server OR if you have a FTP server somewhere (locally), you can use "Ghost 4 Linux" - a bootable CD to make a hard drive - or RAID - clone/backup/restore

I suggest, if possible, that you put a bigger drive in your server, (size of your current RAID configuration) and AVOID RAID-0 for ALL the system - it's stupid in case of failure. One disk lost => everything lost

You should install all the system on RAID-1 or RAID-5 configuration if possible
And, if you need more speed for read/write, for a specific thing (database for example), you can use RAID-0. Anyway, this RAID-0 can be "inside" a RAID-1 , using RAID 0+1 or 1+0

good luck, and double-check your backup before it's too late
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Author Closing Comment

by:tenover
ID: 31580748
Thanks, built a new server running CentOS and am good to go.
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