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Vista -- move D volume from Disk0 to new disk

Posted on 2009-05-13
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Last Modified: 2013-11-29
I'm running short on disk space.  I have my C & D volumes on one disk.

I'm considering buying another disk and moving my D volume to it, then expanding my C volume to the entire Disk0.

Is this feasible?  Without OS reinstalls?

Thanks!

(Vista Business 64-bit)
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Question by:Daniel Wilson
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Assisted Solution

by:v46n
v46n earned 50 total points
ID: 24378319
do you have any programs installed on the d volume or is it just data?
If just data then this is no problem.

If you have programs installed you can use norton ghost and copy the partition to the new disk then in windows delete the partition on disk 0 and resize the c drive.

If there is no problems then plug in the drive create a partition and cut and paste the contents, then resize.

Done this a few times. Another alternative is to ghost drive 0 to a larger drive boot from new drive and use current drive as another partition.
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Assisted Solution

by:rraghu08
rraghu08 earned 50 total points
ID: 24378340
hi Dan
you can do this, if your Windows Vista is installed on your C drive . First connect your new hard disk. then copy the data from your D drive to ur new drive belonging to the new hard disk. You then go to Disk management and delete the D drive and then , right click on Cdrive and click on Extend the volume. You need to manually copy stuff from D drive to ur new hard disk , thorugh windows. You can't do it in Disk management. You could use a third part software to copy data from one drive to other.  Hope this helps.

regards
Raghu
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Author Comment

by:Daniel Wilson
ID: 24378523
I'm pretty sure it's just data.  I was about to start installing programs on D:, since C is running short ... but thought this might be the time to buy another disk.

Thanks for the advice.  I'll get a disk and try it out!
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Accepted Solution

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garycase earned 150 total points
ID: 24378678
As noted above, it's very simple.   Just add the new drive;  go to Disk Management and initialize it (be sure you do NOT convert it to a dynamic disk -- the initialization wizard makes this too easy to accidentally do);  then create a partition and format it.

After you copy all the data from D: to the new drive, you can safely delete D: and then use Disk Management to change the letter of the new drive to D:

Potential complications:  

=>  If you have relocated the Documents folder to D:, you'll need to relocate that before you can delete that partition.   But if that's the case, simply relocate it to the new drive -- then it will automatically copy all the data (it will ask if you want to do that);  and when you later change the drive letter it will automatically be set correctly for the Documents folder.

=>  If you have programs installed on D:, the system will balk at moving them to the new drive letter IF they have any active processes running during the attempted move.   If that's the case, post the details .... there are a variety of workarounds for that, depending on exactly what the issue is.

Bottom line:  It's VERY simply to do as you've suggested.   Note, however, that your current drive is, by modern standards, very small ==> you may also want to simply clone the C: partition to the new drive;  expand it to a more generous size (100GB should be more than enough);  then clone the current D: partition to the new drive and expand it to use all of the rest of the drive -- and then simply relegate your current drive to a backup role.
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by:Daniel Wilson
ID: 24378851
Yeah, when I built the box I was pinching pennies.  Now I need to power this system up since I'm using it for work instead of hobbies.  I went from 1 GB of RAM to 4GB and have just purchased a 750-GB drive.

Thanks for going over the procedure. I was hoping it would be that simple.  We'll see when the drive comes, but you guys have given me confidence!
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Expert Comment

by:garycase
ID: 24379050
Since you're familiar with Boot-It, here's a very simple way to install the new disk ...

(a)  Install the disk (no need to even bother to boot)
(b)  Boot to Boot-It ... as you did before, select CANCEL, then OK, then go to Partition Work
(c)  Select your old disk -- this will PROBABLY be HD-0 (you can tell for sure by the partition structure and size)
(d)  Highlight the first partition; then click Copy.   You'll now see a "Paste pending for Copy" message on the bottom of the screen.
(e)  Select the other disk (this will most likely be HD 1); be sure the free space is highlighted (it should be); then click on Paste
(f)  When it finishes, highlight the partition and click on ReSize ... then make it whatever size you want C: to be
(g)  Repeat the process for the 2nd partition [Select the old disk; highlight the 2nd partition; click Copy; select the new disk; highlight the free space; click Paste; then ReSize it when done (probably to use the rest of the disk)].
(h)  Shut down;  remove the old disk; then boot the system.   If it doesn't boot, boot to Boot-It (same CANCEL, OK, Partition Work sequence); click on View MBR; highlight the first partition; and click the Set Active button.    Then reboot the system and it will work fine :-)
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Author Closing Comment

by:Daniel Wilson
ID: 31581161
Thanks, all.  Worked great!
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