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Migrate a lamp server to new hardware (Centos 5.3)

Posted on 2009-05-14
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Last Modified: 2013-12-26
I need to move my LAMP installation (Centos 5.3, Apache 2, Mysql, Bind, Postfix, all the installed Perl modules, SSL certificate etc.)

to new hardware

old hardware: compaq proliant DL360 g3 in RAID 1 (2 disks à 30GB)
new: Compaq Proliant DL360 g3 in RAID 1 (2 disks à 130GB)

Now my question: what is the simplest way to achieve this?

- have I to install centos 5.3 on the new server, or can I create an image of the old server?
- it would be great if someone could help with a STEP BY STEP guide

Current status: RAID 1 has been configured on the new server

Thanks
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Question by:migarama1
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by:elf_bin
ID: 24383997
Simplest way?  Keep the disks the same (RAID and so on) and use clonezilla (http://clonezilla.org/) to clone the entire machine to the new one (remembering to switch off the old one before you switch on the new one).  You may have a few issues with hardware drivers, but the OS *should* sort that out for you.
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by:migarama1
ID: 24385609
The old server is co-located in another city. Best would be if I could setup the new box at home and once finished, bring it in to the server center.

Installation of Centos on the new box is not a problem. I need to know which folder I need from the old machine to preserve theconfiguration of httpd, Mysql, Bind, Postfix, all the installed Perl modules, SSL certificate etc.

So I could pack each folder and download it
i.e. the folder /home with all the web data
 

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elf_bin earned 250 total points
ID: 24392934
They could be anywhere as it is perfectly possible to configure these daemons anywhere and just tell the daemons where to look for the configuration files at start-up.  But the defaults are:
/etc/httpd/ is where the Apache configurations and so on are kept.
/etc/my.cnf MySQL database (don't forget the database though)
/var/named/ is the DNS stuff (could be chrooted to there too) & /etc/named.conf
/usr/lib/perl5/site_perl/ is where you're *supposed* to install your site specific perl stuff
/var/www/perl is where the /perl/ is (by default) in the URL of httpd
The web site stuff (including logs and so on) is supposed to be in /var/www/
/etc/sysconfig/httpd httpd configuration file (most people probably don't use this and just use /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf
/etc/postfix for postfix (don't forget your mail directory too)
Probably best to look at the web sites in /etc/httpd/conf.d/ & each config file will tell you where the web site gets it's data from and to.

Hope this helps.
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