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Group policy - domain policies appearing last then first in precedence

Posted on 2009-05-14
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Last Modified: 2012-05-07
We run 2003 terminal servers with 2003 AD and use computer GPOs but recently we needed to split users into two OUs - one OU will use a proxy via a user GPO and the other group won't use the proxy via a different GPO.  The relevant user GPO will be merged with the computer GPOs via loopback.

The particular user GPO to apply the proxy is not working.  When I run rsop.msc and check the precedence for the proxy settings, a couple of domain policies are at the top with the proxy "<disabled>".  But those domain policies don't even have any proxy settings configured (enabled or disabled).  Plus, they appear at the bottom of the precedence AND at the top.  I thought GPOs were applied in this order: local, site, domain, OU.  

So how can the proxy be disabled when the GPO settings aren't even configured in the domain GPOs and why are the domain GPOs at the very top of the precedence level?  It must be something I've missed!
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Question by:lrkwalkers
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by:schriste
ID: 24473124
I'd review this site: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc778890(WS.10).aspx

The exceptions to the precedence might be what is tripping you up.
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lrkwalkers earned 0 total points
ID: 24479054
This has been resolved by the IT company we outsource work to.

I will get more info.

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