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SQL Advanced INNER JOIN

Can anyone explain how T-SQL interprets the following queries based on their respective joins? Does SQL ignore where the ON part of the JOIN is located? They seem to return the same rows and values...but I have never seen the second style join EVER used -- I've search google for hours now, with no explanation.

SELECT *
FROM BillingItem As B
   INNER JOIN Charge As C
      on B.ChargeID = C.IDCharge
   INNER JOIN Patient As P
      On P.IDPatient = C.PatientID

SELECT *
FROM BillingItem As B
   INNER JOIN Charge As C  
   INNER JOIN Patient As P
   On P.IDPatient = C.PatientID       
   On B.ChargeID = C.IDCharge


Thanks -

Mike
0
dsiproductteam
Asked:
dsiproductteam
3 Solutions
 
Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]Billing EngineerCommented:
>Can anyone explain how T-SQL interprets the following queries
run the queries with the Query -> include actual explain plan set, and you will get the full explain plan in an additional tab.
speaking of the sql management studio ...



apart from that, I have read recently about the second style... which is, imho, just an obscure form that actually does the same .
so, my suggestion is: forget it ...
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dsiproductteamAuthor Commented:
The execution plans are the same in SQL 2005, but appear slightly different in SQL 2000. SQL 2000 includes information about Hash Match/Join, which I am totally unfamiliar with.

I am downloading some live client data right now to compare the difference in the behavior in SQL 2000 and 2005 just to make sure. I'll post that information when I have it.

Thanks..
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chapmandewCommented:
both statements are the same....the 2nd is just uglier than the first.
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tcullerCommented:
I'd agree with chapmandew. The way the SQL "Compiler", if you will, works is by taking multiple passes at your statement. It looks like they designers of this particular RDBMS allowed a different syntax with multiple inner joins. Because of the multiple passes, either query will result in the "compiler" disassembling the query down to the same thing.
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dsiproductteamAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your help. Through my research, I've come to the same conclusion.
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