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Prevent SQL Injection

Hi to all,

I have the code below and I want to make sure that it is the best way to try and prevent SQL injection.

I am using Free text for my search in order to let the user type in a description of the item. I am also using full text search on that table.

What would I need to do more to prevent successful attacks on my DB?
Any suggestion would be welcomed.

Thanks
Public Shared Function LoadItemSearch(ByVal ItemDescription As String) As SqlDataReader
            Dim connection As New SqlConnection _
            (RMSConnectionString.StoreCon.ConnectionString)
 
            Dim SQLCommand As SqlClient.SqlCommand
            Dim strSQL As String
            connection.Open()
            Try
 
                strSQL = "Select  Item.ID, Item.ItemLookupCode, UPPER(Item.Description) As Description,    " & _
                            "Item.ExtendedDescription AS ItemDescription, Item.PictureName  " & _
                            " FROM Item INNER JOIN Department ON Item.DepartmentID = Department.ID    " & _
                            " WHERE (Item.Inactive = 0) And Item.WebItem = 0 And Item.ItemType <> 7 And Item.Quantity > 0   " & _
                            " And FreeText(Description, @Item) " & _
                            " ORDER BY SubDescription2 DESC"
 
                SQLCommand = New SqlClient.SqlCommand(strSQL, connection)
                SQLCommand.Parameters.Add(New SqlParameter("@Item", Data.SqlDbType.VarChar)).Value _
                = ItemDescription
               
                Dim MyReader As SqlDataReader = SQLCommand.ExecuteReader
                Return MyReader
                connection.Close()
                SQLCommand.Dispose()
                connection.Dispose()
            Catch Exp As SqlClient.SqlException
                Throw Exp
            End Try
        End Function

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0
ALawrence007
Asked:
ALawrence007
4 Solutions
 
d1rtyw0rmCommented:
You are doing great by using parameterised queries.

This is where the SQL Command uses a parameter instead of injecting the values directly into the command. The particular second-order attack above would not have been possible if parameterised queries had been used.

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Stored Procedures add an extra layer of abstraction in to the design of a software system. This means that, so long as the interface on the stored procedure stays the same, the underlying table structure can change with no noticeable consequence to the application that is using the database. This layer of abstraction also helps put up an extra barrier to potential attackers. If access to the data in SQL Server is only ever permitted via stored procedures, then permission does not need to be explicitly set on any of the tables. Therefore, none of the tables should ever need to be exposed directly to outside applications. For an outside application to read or modify the database, it must go through stored procedures. Even though some stored procedures, if used incorrectly, could potentially damage the database, anything that can reduce the attack surface is beneficial.

Stored procedures can be written to validate any input that is sent to them to ensure the integrity of the data beyond the simple constraints otherwise available on the tables. Parameters can be checked for valid ranges. Information can be cross checked with data in other tables.

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Encrypt sensitive data.
Access the database using an account with the least privileges necessary.
Install the database using an account with the least privileges necessary.
Ensure that data is valid.
Do a code review to check for the possibility of second-order attacks.
Use parameterised queries.
Use stored procedures.
Re-validate data in stored procedures.
Ensure that error messages give nothing away about the internal architecture of the application or the database.


http://unixwiz.net/techtips/sql-injection.html

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Jorge PaulinoIT Pro/DeveloperCommented:
You have allot of links provided already, but basically you need to use Stored Procedures with parameters passed to him, to ensure that you're SQL Injection safe.
0
 
ALawrence007Author Commented:
Thank you SO much guys!
I added Stored procs to make my site more secure
0
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