Desktop Computer constantly shutting itself off

My daughter's computer which I built for her 2 years ago is deciding to turn itself off constantly. My first guess was there was a fan not functioning which was causing overheating and the sensors are just preserving the PC by shutting it down when it gets too hot.

It was off most of the day and as we turn it on, it will shut itself down before it even gets to start booting Windows. And repeatedly shut itself down at different points. Yesterday it was getting to the desktop sometimes and then turning off.

We have taken it apart and cleaned out the dust and things which we are pretty good at keeping up on, but could be better. all the fans are working just fine and it seems like there is not an airflow problem. also the case and PSU all feel pretty cool to the touch.

Looking for any ideas on how to remedy this or anything I can try. My options are limited as I cannot even get it to the desktop now.

I appreciate any help that can be offered.

Anthony
LVL 17
Anthony RussoAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

KavostylinCommented:
This could be anything.

You will usually find that the problem will be related to heat or power.
0
alienvoiceCommented:
Hmmm, that is a broad question, but it is usually related to hardware. Could be a powersupply problem, (dirty powersupply), RAM, Motherboard or Videocard.

I'd more than likely say, MB or Powersupply.

Hope this helps.

0
KavostylinCommented:
Ok looks like i have to get you a full solution.

If the system is powering on and there is no burning smell from the back of the PSU that is not the problem. all though the fan is spinning on the CPU heatsink if the Thermal Paste that sits between the CPU core and the heatsink which aids in the transfer of heat has begun to cake and become dry then that can hinder the dispersion of heat. If you are confident in doing this yourself i would suggest removing the heatsink and replacing the thermal compound and cleaning out inbetween the fins of the heatsink.

If this still gives you problem after that it is more than likely going to be a mainboard issue. I suggest once you power the machine back on open up BIOS and just allow it to sit on the PC Health section (the part that tells you CPU temp and FAN rpm etc) see if you can see any abnormalities.

intel standard op temp should be around 45-50
Amd is normal to be slightly higher.

let me know if you need any more information

KAVO
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
Newly released Acronis True Image 2019

In announcing the release of the 15th Anniversary Edition of Acronis True Image 2019, the company revealed that its artificial intelligence-based anti-ransomware technology – stopped more than 200,000 ransomware attacks on 150,000 customers last year.

ChristophermageeCommented:
How is the cpu going tempreture wise?   That would cause the kinds of shutdowns you are experiencing, If it does seem pretty hot you could take the heatsink off apply some arctic silver and put it back on again.

However like previously mentioned it could be anything bad powersupply, motherboard Ram or videocard.   i would look at the powersupply first then the Mboard.

0
Anthony RussoAuthor Commented:
Thank you for the quick responses and I apologize for the broad question also.

I wouldn't think it is the PSU as it isn't even warm when the PC shuts down. I was trying to get to the BIOS to check the temp but it wont even stay on that long to get there.

I believe myself that it is a heat problem and CPU related as well. (I've been down the road before). I didn't think that it might be the thermal paste hardening and that will be the first thing I check tomorrow. Simple and cheap as a first effort.

I will post the result once I get to it.

Much appreciated

Anthony
0
KavostylinCommented:
Not a problem.
Please note if the PC gets used often then the thermal compound supplied with CPU's is not sufficent.

As metioned by Christophermagee i would suggest getting a half decent compund such as "arctic Silver" it's usually between $10-20 as tube and will last you a long time. It also has a higher heat resilience which means it will not cake for usually between double to triple the time as reguler compound will.

Let me know how you go.

KAVO
0
Anthony RussoAuthor Commented:
What is the best and safest way to clean the old compound off the CPU before applying the new compound if it is caked on?

If I remove the heatsink and it is not caked on but looks fine, should I remove it and try with the better compound?

Anthony
0
KavostylinCommented:
Definately.

Regardless of whether it looks caked or not it is always good practise once you have removed a heatsink to add new compund.

just a tissue or a cotton tip should be fine. make sure you have removed the CPU from the mainboard first.

KAVO
0
ChristophermageeCommented:
I personally use cleaning alcohol and a cotton tip and clean till i get a mirror finish.  However I usually overclock machines to every little bit counts.  You can do it with water and a cotton tip just make sure.

http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions.htm

How much paste you put on is important.  Here is a great guide from arctic silver covers different cpu types.

Chris

0
KavostylinCommented:
Never use water. EVER EVER EVER...

I would always use either alcohol (preferably and ethanol based).
0
Anthony RussoAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all the tips and excellent guides Christophermagee.

Anthony
0
ChristophermageeCommented:
I thought water only gave it issues if you left it on for awhile, I know its made from aluminum but it takes a little while to oxidize.  
0
KavostylinCommented:
its not ozidization if you leave some form of condesation behind can cause cracks in the core once it heats up.
0
sherenianCommented:
If replacing the thermal paste does not rectify your problem then I have one other option.  If you have a copper tube based heatsink which is usually a plate that sits on the CPU which has anywhere from 4-8 copper pipes coming off that plate and transferring to the fins of the heatsink, you may have a pinhole air leak in the copper tubing and the heatsink isn't able to do its job of drawing heat away from the CPU.  I've had this happen 3 times so far.  Replacing the heatsink corrected the problem in each case.  Normally you can tell this is the issue because even after replacing the thermal paste you can touch the heatsink during bootup and its very cool to the touch all the way up until the point the PC shuts off.   You can tell its not drawing heat away.
0
Anthony RussoAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all the assistance
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Components

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.