Users are logged on to windows 2008 terminal server with temporary user profiles.

I think I may have caused myself a lot of work when trying to speed up logging on to my windows 2008 terminals servers. My problem last month has been the slow mapping of printers when users log on to servers. After reading A LOT of suggestions here concerning how to speed that up I implemented som of them and found a moderate increase in speed. However, when I Iooked at my servers i noticed that there was about 5 GB (!) of cached userprofiles under "Users" on each of my servers. I spoke to a colleuge of mine and asked if that was normal and he was surprised. He told me that all these profiles were supposed to be deleted when the users logged off.

Back at my machines I controlled that noone was working with the servers (noone was logged on to them) and then I deleted the cached userfiles.( I remeber that we used to do this several years ago in our old citrixservers when they got filled up.)
After cleaning my testprofile from one server like that , and then logging on to it again as "testuser" I happily noticed that Logging on to the server was a lot faster, as was the printermapping.

I started cleaning cached folders from a few other machines and while I was doing that,  I remebered reading about windows XP. In that article they suggested that the correct way to remove cached user profiles was through Advanced systemsettings\Profiles and Add/Remove profiles. On the last few servers I used  this method instead of just deleting folders. (It took a lot longer...)

I know that we had a process on our old 2003-servers that was called user hive cleanup and that it removed old sessioninformation from terminal servers. We don't have that on our 2008 servers.

Well,  here is my problem:

1. When users log on to my TS servers most of them experience no problems. However a few does! The only get a temporary userprofile. Event id is 1511 and 1515. Why?

2. The servers that had the cached profiles removed through Advanced systemsettings\Profiles and Add/Remove profiles seem to work better, but one of them still has a few users that only get a temporary profile.

3. In our 2003-servers we sometimes (but rarely)  had to rename the profile-folder on the users fileshare in order to have the system create a new one when he/she logged on. We used to run user hive cleanup on those servers and we had no problem with users logging on to TS-servers with no cached profiles on them. Does windows 2008 require cached profiles?
Is it because of this I can´t find a windows 2008 server x64 version of UHP?


I really fear I have messed things up and I wonder if someone out there have made a similar misstake? What should I do ?
 
Stefan_SSAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Stefan_SSAuthor Commented:
Hello again!


I looked around and found an article about Windows Vista based systems that seemed to apply. If some one else has this problem they should look at this:


http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=947242

This worked for me!

Cheers!
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Microsoft Server OS

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.