Windows XP, tcp/ip client to server app code?

I have some xp machines that I need to network together. Each of the machines has to send out data packets to a master machine. I am planning on tcp/ip across the network with the server program on the master and the client on the other machines. What I would like to do, is to have the client code send the information via packets to the server app on the server machine.
Would like to do this in c++ cpp as that I have already written the client machines software. Originally these were stand alone apps but we need to link them for data management.
I have found an open source tcp/ip library on the web, komodia. However, was wondering if there are alternatives via winsock api and basic documentation to get me on my way. Everytime I try something new I feel again like a newb...

Thanks in advance.

R. Schaefer

LVL 1
robear0001Asked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

mrjoltcolaCommented:
If you have a small budget, you might consider spending a little for a commercial network sdk. It will save you hours of coding, you'll have a working app very quickly and can move on to non-network tasks.

http://www.nsoftware.com/ipworks/

I cannot comment on komodia, I have never used it. I have used ipworks and chilkat. ipworks is much easier for a beginner.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
evilrixSenior Software Engineer (Avast)Commented:
Take a look a thrift, it is an platform independent RCP protocol/API developed by Facebook. It's quite simple to knock up a thrift client/server. You just design the interface using thrifts Interface Description Langauge (IDL) and then run it through the thrift compiler, and out squirts client/server interfaces with all the RPC protocol stuff already written for you.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thrift_(protocol)

"Thrift is a remote procedure call framework developed at Facebook for "scalable cross-language services development". It combines a software stack with a code generation engine to build services that work efficiently and seamlessly between C++, C#, Java, Perl, Python, PHP, Erlang and Ruby. Although developed at Facebook, it is now an open source project in the Apache Software Foundation Incubator."

http://developers.facebook.com/thrift/

"Thrift is a software framework for scalable cross-language services development. It combines a powerful software stack with a code generation engine to build services that work efficiently and seamlessly between C++, Java, Python, PHP, and Ruby. Thrift was developed at Facebook and released as open source.

Overview

Thrift allows you to define data types and service interfaces in a simple definition file. Taking that file as input, the compiler generates code to be used to easily build RPC clients and servers that communicate seamlessly across programming languages.

Thrift is one of Facebook's core software engineering resources. It is used in various ways across many products, including: Search, Mobile, Posts, Notes, Feed, Platform. If you use the site, you've used Thrift."
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
TCP/IP

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.