Email goes straight to junk mail folder in recipient's outlook

Hi experts

One of our clients has a problem with their email.  Everyone they send a message to, when the recipient gets it, it automatically goes into the Junk Mail folder.  I thought there might be something wrong with the reverse DNS lookup, but that was correct.  I also checked the Blacklists to see if their Exchange Server was blacklisted, but I didn't find anything listed about the server in question.  They are using MX Logic.

What should I look at next?  

Thanks.
Ray DrummondLan Administrator IIIAsked:
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JMorganReadCommented:
I apologize if this is what you said you've already done, I wasn't sure.  

When you say 'checked the blacklists' do you mean that you checked the blacklists on the server or that you checked exterior blacklists?  What you're saying sounds like their domain is blacklisted - I would check it with something like the DNSBl checks (http://www.dnsbl.info/index.php).  

Let me know how it turns out.
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Ray DrummondLan Administrator IIIAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the reply.

I checked with the site you mentioned and all the results were ok.  Beforehand, I had checked both the external and internal server's blackslists.
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notacomputergeekCommented:
Does it happen with anyone else's account on the same Exchange server? Can someone else send an e-mail to the same recipient and get different results?

What's in the user's signature? Lots of cutesy stuff? Is their name Viagra? Anything that might be considered a trigger for a spam filter?
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Ray DrummondLan Administrator IIIAuthor Commented:
This happens to anyone on the same Exchange server.  They are using basic text signatures.  Nothing too unusualy that might cause a spam filter to catch it.
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JMorganReadCommented:
What domain does the email end in?  (.com, .net. .ir, .nz, etc)  I know lots of programs that have the ability to filter out email according to the country prefix of the email.  Other things to look for include excessive numbers in the email address (jsmith12345@somewhere.com).  The default on most programs here is that anything more then 4 will be flagged as spam - I've had to change it to accomodate universities which often use 4 digits appended to differentiate accounts.

Have you read the headers of the emails?  If you have a relationship with someone you send to or if you can self-test, most email programs will insert a flag in the header to let administrators know why/if it was flagged by that email program.
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Ray DrummondLan Administrator IIIAuthor Commented:
It ends in .net.  They are using first initial last name as their email addresses.  I'll have to get someone to send me a message again and check the headers.
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Ray DrummondLan Administrator IIIAuthor Commented:
I've looked at the header for the message, but it doesn't give me anything specific about why it went to the Junk Mail folder.  I sent a message from the exchange server to my Gmail account and it came thru fine.  The domain is jandjconst.net.
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JMorganReadCommented:
Would you mind posting the error?  Feel free to X out the IP addresses for privacy and security.
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JMorganReadCommented:
Er.  Header, not error :)  Sorry, I've errors on the brain today.
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Ray DrummondLan Administrator IIIAuthor Commented:
Received: from p01c11m082.mxlogic.net (x.x.x.x) by
 remote.dmhcomputers.com (x.x.x.x) with Microsoft SMTP Server (TLS) id
 8.1.358.0; Tue, 2 Jun 2009 09:47:04 -0400
Received: from unknown [x.x.x.x] (EHLO jandjconst.net)      by
 p01c11m082.mxlogic.net (mxl_mta-6.2.0-4)      with ESMTP id
 65d252a4.3022265232.33992.00-174.p01c11m082.mxlogic.net (envelope-from
 <dmhcomp@jandjconst.net>);      Tue, 02 Jun 2009 07:47:03 -0600 (MDT)
Content-Class: urn:content-classes:message
Subject: test 3
Date: Tue, 2 Jun 2009 09:47:02 -0400
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="=_reb-r17D0BDC5-t4A252D57"
Message-ID: <9A73F572884DD24A8E92695D963223F20282C7@jjsbs01.JJConstruction.local>
X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft Exchange V6.5
X-MS-Has-Attach:
X-MS-TNEF-Correlator:
Thread-Topic: test 3
Thread-Index: AcnjiJvYlgkRO9huRTS2qnRj8dSSRw==
From: DMH Computers <dmhcomp@jandjconst.net>
To: <ray@dmhcomputers.com>
X-Processed-By: Rebuild v2.0-0
X-Spam: [F=0.2727272924; B=0.500(0); CM=0.500; MH=0.500(2009060216); R=0.600(1095221541); S=0.200(2009052001); SS=0.500; SC=none]
X-MAIL-FROM: <dmhcomp@jandjconst.net>
X-SOURCE-IP: [x.x.x.x]
X-AnalysisOut: [v=1.0 c=1 a=OVStE8acMf3L4PKSpVmPAQ==:17 a=nS36O97Bj3wUElCr]
X-AnalysisOut: [IrAA:9 a=WSUfejPYnVaDIwHsvJh5HpFP3bwA:4 a=34UrBboqUjha5vgd]
X-AnalysisOut: [7UkA:9 a=w8gG1kGPofsgq6KDD_QA:7 a=V5Spi5_Om2wQF4eVLGxZqvIf]
X-AnalysisOut: [DmcA:4]
Return-Path: dmhcomp@jandjconst.net
X-MS-Exchange-Organization-PRD: jandjconst.net
X-MS-Exchange-Organization-SenderIdResult: None
Received-SPF: None (DMHSBS01.dmh.local: dmhcomp@jandjconst.net does not
 designate permitted sender hosts)
X-MS-Exchange-Organization-SCL: 1
X-MS-Exchange-Organization-PCL: 2
X-MS-Exchange-Organization-Antispam-Report:
 DV:3.3.5705.600;SID:SenderIDStatus None;OrigIP:208.65.144.247
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JMorganReadCommented:
I think it's that this domain doesn't have a sender policy framework (SPF).  It's not required by any stretch, but it is something that more and more companies are using to try and reduce the amount of spam they receive.  

You can read about SPFs here: http://www.openspf.org/Introduction
..and Sender ID here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa996295.aspx 

It's relatively easy to set up an SPF and 'verify' the sending server so that other mail servers have a sense of authenticity.

It's what seems to make the most sense- according to that header the email wasn't suspicious enough to get flagged by spam or phishing filters.  If they have their hosts set to use reject SPF failures, it would account for being flagged as spam.
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