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Wireless Network Channels

Posted on 2009-06-29
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Last Modified: 2013-11-09
I want to use about 12 WAPs in an area with many rooms, building has lots of metal and plaster.  I probably know just enough to be dangerous about Wireless.  ;)  I understand that it's recommended to use channels 1,6 & 11 as the other channels have a tendency to bleed.  I was reading about WAPs that overlap being a problem.  I'm going to use the same SSID on all WAPs and they're all on the same subnet.  

Is that OK, if I split up the WAPs and only use those three channels 1,6 & 11 or will that be too much overlapping?  
Is that OK, if some areas can see multiple WAPs available, and some are on the same channel, e.g., 6 & 6.  Seems like it could take me a long time to layout one WAP at a time and try to get really finicky on the distance between the WAPs?

Should I set all the WAPs to use the same speed, e.g., 54Mbps if the signal strength is Excellent with high SNR readings?

How about Cisco's option to use the Throughput function vs. the Broadcast feature?  I'd rather get good throughput and use more WAPs if need be, if that makes sense.

Thanks!
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Question by:rotarypwr
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akahan earned 1500 total points
ID: 24741666
You seem to have a misunderstanding about "bleed".

ALL the channels bleed into adjacent channels.  There's nothing special about 1, 6, and 11, except that they are far apart from each other.  So if you are using three channels, you'd choose 1, 6 and 11 to optimize the distance of your channels one from another.

If you have more than three WAPS, you would put each of them on a different channel to minimize interference with each other.  It's much better to have them on 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 11, for example, than to have two of them on 1, two of them on 6, and two of them on 11.

In the perfect world, there would be no place in your office where you could see more than one WAP on the same channel and, ideally, you would want to arrange things so that WAPs on adjacent channels are also relatively far away from one another.



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