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How can I make this regular expression case insensitive?

mrcoulson
mrcoulson asked
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Last Modified: 2012-05-07
The regular expression below evaluates email addresses in my RegularExpressionValidator.  It is case-sensitive and only allows lowercase.  I would like it to allow uppercase as well.  I don't even understand how the thing works really, so I don't know where to begin modifying it.  How do I make it case-insensitive?
[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?

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Commented:
use RegexOptions.IgnoreCase option.

Author

Commented:
You may call me a lazy programmer, but this is all handled by a RegularExpressionValidator.
<asp:RegularExpressionValidator ID="vldSenderEmailFormat" runat="server" ControlToValidate="txtSenderEmail" ErrorMessage="Please enter a valid email address in the 'Your Email' field." ValidationExpression="[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?" Display="None" />

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Author

Commented:
Lord, I need to read a book on regular expressions.  Let me try those!

Jeremy

Author

Commented:
Both of those evaluate false.
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Commented:
Show me the test string.

Author

Commented:
Wait a second.  It could be that I wasn't paying attention and pasted them into the wrong document.  Der.

Jeremy

Author

Commented:
The first one seems to work.  Whew.  Could you go the extra mile and explain it a little to me?  Regular expressions look like massive sneezings of random characters and I'd like to understand them better.
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Commented:
I can only say that I added A-Z to the pattern in all places that you had a-z to make it case-insensitive.
I cannot say that the pattern actually will validate e-mail addresses (I would submit that validation of any/all e-mail addresses cannot be done with regex alone).

But, for some syntax starters:
[...] is a character set, any characters included within are treated as one set.
* is repeating 0 or more times.
+ is repeating 1 or more times.
. is any character
\ escapes any special characters such as . to make them match literally, such as \. would match "."
\w is a character class for [A-Za-z_]

I have a online regex tester here (PHP PCRE/.NET):
http://www.myregextester.com/

A cheatsheet:
http://regexlib.com/CheatSheet.aspx

Tutorials:
http://www.regular-expressions.info/
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Commented:
mrcoulson, is there anything else I can provide regarding the solution?

Author

Commented:
No, points are forthcoming.  I really appreciate the extra effort with the explanations.  I think I seriously need to do some studying in my downtime.

Thanks!

Jeremy

Author

Commented:
Thanks a ton!
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Commented:
If you are serious about learning more you might consider finding a copy of the definitive reference text on the subject:
http://regex.info/
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Commented:
Thanks for the question and the points.
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