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Costs in a co-existence environment

Posted on 2009-06-30
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Hi

We currently have a 2007/2003 mixed Exchange system in a hub and spoke environment. HQ=hub, and we have Site1, Site2, Site3. HQ is in 2003, all regional Sites are in 2007.

Each site has a seperate CAS, HT and MBX server. The regional sites are in the Exchange 2007 routing group, HQ is in Routing Group1.

Each HT has a RGC to Routing Group1 of cost 20.

I notice that if I change the cost of Site1's HT>Routing Group 1 connector to 10, then *ALL* mails to HQ are sent via this connector, regardless of which site's MBX server they originate from.

So, my question is, in a mixed mode environment, does Exchange 2007 use AD site link costs, or routing group costs (where the cost to other HT's in the Exchange 2007 Routing group is 0)?
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Question by:bruce_77
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by:Saakar
ID: 24749217
hi,

This might help !!!

Managing Exchange 2003 Settings in a Coexistence Environment
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa995972.aspx

Implementing Exchange Server 2007 for coexistence with Exchange Server 2003
http://www.msexchange.org/tutorials/Implementing-Exchange-Server-2007-coexistence-Exchange-Server-2003.html

- Saakar
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by:Mestha
ID: 24749560
When it comes to mixed environments, the AD routing doesn't come in to it. In effect Exchange 2007 goes back to the way that Exchange 2003 works. It has to.
You can sort of get things to work in a different way using multiple SMTP and Send Connectors, but it can get messy very quickly.

Simon
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by:bruce_77
ID: 24749616
Ah, so Exchange only used AD site costs in a pure 2007 environment? In a mixed environment, it uses the 2003 method of routing group connector costs?
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by:Mestha
ID: 24749804
How can it co-exist otherwise?
Exchange 2003 can't use AD site.
The only way that AD sites would be used would be between Exchange 2007 servers.

Simon.
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by:bruce_77
ID: 24749830
I meant how does it work out the cost between HT's in different sites in a mixed environment? It can either

i) Use AD site costs
ii) Use routing group connector costs and consider all HT's as within the same Routing Group, with an associated cost of 0.
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by:Mestha
ID: 24750132
Basically, as far as Exchange 2003 is concerned, all of the Exchange 2007 servers are in the same routing group.
Therefore if you have created multiple routing group connectors, then unless they are of equal costs, the lowest one will be used by all of the servers. If they are all at the same cost, then load balancing will occur - in effect email will go via the connector you have created.

Email between Exchange 2007 servers will use AD Sites information, because Exchange 2003 isn't involved.

Simon.
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by:bruce_77
ID: 24750208
Hi Simon

Great, thanks for the answer. Just one final question if you don't mind...

How about if both Exchange 2003 and 2007 servers are involved?

So, for example, the mail goes from a 2007 MBX server to a 2007 Hub Transport and then to a 2003 Bridghead and then out to a 3rd party SMTP relay before being sent to the internet? Let's say there were multiple routes...we have to consider both the routing group connector costs (HT > 2003 Bridghead server) and also costs between the HT's...can you mix AD site costs and routing group connector costs when considering the same path?
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Accepted Solution

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Mestha earned 500 total points
ID: 24750342
Email that is going outside to the internet uses SMTP connectors, which are seen by Exchange 2007 as Send Connectors that it cannot modify.
In the SMTP/Send Connector you can set the bridgehead.
The bridgehead is the server that sends the email to the Internet.
If the bridgehead is an Exchange 2003 server then the RGC comes in to play to get the email to the bridgehead. Once the email arrives it is delivered.

Therefore the email from the Exchange 2007 servers going to the internet will go over the routing group connectors to the Exchange 2003 bridgehead.
If you change your structure so that there is one RGC between one Exchange 2007 server and the Exchange 2003 server, then all email will go to that hub transport server.

Simon.
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