Database table is not visible. How to make it visible?

I created a database with MS SQL Management Sudio and added a database to it. For now logging in is through the Windows NT authentication. My problem is that I am working on an application and plan and ODBC access to the database and table. I'm able to log on to the database. However the app cannot find the table. I compiled a Microsoft app that lists all tables under that database. Surprisingly, it lists all System Tables, all dbo schemas, and others not even shown in Management Studio. Yet my table is nowhere to be seen, though it is also listed in Management Studio as a dbo schema.

How do I make that visible? It seems to be some restriction in terms of security or similar but I don't know where to look, as I've tried comparing the other accesses (Master, etc) that are there.
RJVAsked:
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8080_DiverCommented:
It sounds like you may not have any permissions on that table.  
Can you open the database in Management Studio and look at the permissions for the Username you are using to access the data from your app?  If so, be sure to look at the permissions for that specific user.  Does that user have access to the table?  (If it is a Windows User, you may have to check the groups that to see which group it is in and then check the Group's permissions. ;-)
If you do not have at least Read Access, then the table will not appear to exist.
 
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RJVAuthor Commented:
Both access though Windows (system logon). As to Groups this computer is not associated to any groups. Having said that, maybe Management Studio is taking that into account. Where would I find the database Groups in Management Studio? I just hunted around and couldn't find it. Any other tips of security checkpoints will certainly help me drill down.
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RJVAuthor Commented:
Looking through Management Studio, everything seems to have security related to it, from the logical users and data to the schema. Right now all I do is log on to the OS and then load Management Studio, with SQL starting up as the usual service. As to the app, I set it also to the same security as the OS. Evidently, not good enough though all I want is something simple. Try to change it and I also have to settle to what is built in. So, having said that, might you suggest what I check out exactly, even if to create another table and/or database. I want to simplify however much I can.
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Jagdish DevakuSr DB ArchitectCommented:
try to give necessary permissions to BUILTIN/Administrators for the database. normally we give sysadmin permissions to this user id.
try to do it check whether the you are able to view the table for windows authentication login.
bye.
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RJVAuthor Commented:
The not so unusual amazing thing. When I posted the question here I suspected of a permissions issue, or something done wrong in Management Studio. Of course, it could also be at the ODBC level or even my code. After looking everything over I decided to ask those who know SQL better (not my goal; suffice to suffer with C++, MFC, threads, etc). As it turned out, you also wondered about permissions. Thus I focused more on that area, in as much as that is possible in Management Studio.

Late yesterday, after over scratching my head, I decided to set this checkbox in ODBC:

   Change the default database to:

...and then select the database I had already selected to access. Why hadn't I done that before? It didn't and does not make sense. Let's face it, I had accessed that very same database and even test connected to it. Well, that did the trick! I hope this helps you or anyone else here in the future.

So, while I didn't get a specific solution to my problem, thanks to your pointers I was better able to zero in. So I will award the points in thanks for effort that led to the solution.
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Microsoft SQL Server 2005

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