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How to check server using SAN or local disk drive in windows

Posted on 2009-06-30
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Last Modified: 2012-05-07
Hi,
I wonder how in Windows server we can determine current disk allocated are belongs to local disk or SAn disk, any command or windows tool can help me to identify the disk?
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Question by:motioneye
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by:Joseph Tshiteya
ID: 24751604
What version of Windows are you working with?
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by:motioneye
ID: 24752168
windows server 2003 mostly
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by:Joseph Tshiteya
ID: 24753431
You may want to use "diskpart" from the command prompt and retrieve information about individual disks, partitions and/or volumes.
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Joseph Tshiteya earned 500 total points
ID: 24753436
Here is a link you might find helpful:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/300415

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