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Motherboard swap over

Posted on 2009-07-01
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Last Modified: 2012-05-07
Guys,

I have a question.  I have been a tech for quite sometimes and in the line of my job is to constantly replace motherboards.  I have noticed that half of the time, I have a BSOD running in a XPSP2/SP3 environment.  Two ways of fixing this problem, it is to either repair windows or to reinstall windows from scratch.  I thought that motherboards are all identical and one of the other techs was saying that all motherboard are unique, they hold something similar to SID, hence the BSOD.  His theory holds true but I would like a concrete and logical answer as to why there is a BSOD in the first place.  I have noted down the BSOD error and most of the time it is either a 7B error message or a 0000000xE error message.  Could someone explain this problem?  I am not after a fix, I am after a concrete logical explanation.  Thanks.
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Question by:Submedown
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7 Comments
 
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Assisted Solution

by:nobus
nobus earned 75 total points
ID: 24753081
in identical mobo's you should not get a BSOD; in most cases, they are caused by different chipsets
you can avoid it by removing the disk and chipset drivers before you start the new mobo up
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smiffy13 earned 350 total points
ID: 24753460
When windows is installed, it creates a "HAL" file (Hardware Abstraction Layer) http://www.topqualityfreeware.com/whatis/whatisahal.html If you then change the chipset and other motherboard devices then the old HAL file needs to be updated with the changed devices. The easiest way to do this is by doing a windows repair.
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by:TekServer
TekServer earned 75 total points
ID: 24754302
Most commonly these BSOD's are caused by the mobo's having different IDE/SATA controller chipsets.  You can have two different motherboards that use the same storage controller chipset, and you most likely won't get a BSOD.  But if you have two mobo's by the same manufacturer where the only difference is the storage controller - BSOD every time.

With that in mind, if you are upgrading a mobo - i.e. the machine will still boot and run with the old mobo - you can avoid the BSOD by preloading the storage controller and chipset drivers for the new mobo before you make the swap.  (If this isn't an option, and the old mobo is nonfunctional because of swollen caps or something, then you're stuck with the repair or reinstall option.)

hth
:)
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LVL 92

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by:nobus
nobus earned 75 total points
ID: 24755338
looks like you agree with me, tekserver
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by:TekServer
TekServer earned 75 total points
ID: 24756529
Basically, yes, but i was clarifying that the issue is most often caused more by the storage controller than the chipset.  You can have two mobo's with different chipsets that happen to use the same type of storage controller, and you'll have a pretty good chance of migrating a Windows install from one to the other without a BSOD.

No guarantees, of course; MS doesn't always need a good reason to BSOD ...

;)
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by:TekServer
TekServer earned 75 total points
ID: 24756539
(To put it in more blunt terms:  I'm not trying to steal your Accept; I'm just fishing for an Assist.)

;)
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Expert Comment

by:TekServer
ID: 24775963
Thanks!

Glad we could help.

:)
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