Smart Array 532 Degraded Array/Missing Hard Drive

I have a smart array 532 in a Compaq ML350G3 server. The other day the controller detected that my Hot Swap SCSI Drive in bay 2 was changed to bay 6. Then the drive failed. This caused my array to be degraded due to a failed drive in addition to my server not having a bay 6. Thus when I add the replacement drive into the proper bay 2 the array will not auto fix itself because the drive is not in bay 6. replacement drive in bay 2 is a brand new functioning drive that I can not seem to get to work as a hot-spare.

How do I fix this? Since the array configuration is stored on the drives is it possible to hex edit the drive to remove the bay 6 mapping and point it back to bay 2?
fa2lerrorAsked:
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andyalderSaggar maker's bottom knockerCommented:
I don't think there is a fix for this on a 5xxx controller except to backup/restore. The drive ID change happens sometimes and then after the failure you can't even modify the array to add a spare.

HP won't release details of the RIS which is what needs editing on each disk and you can't do it through the controller anyway.
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Iain MacMillanIT Regional Manager - UKCommented:
the server has 6 drive bays, how many do you have drives fitted to??  They are numbered from 0 through to 5, so if the array controller is asking about drive 6, likely that its drive/slot ID 5.  Had a lot of experience on DL380's with 642 controllers playing up, turned out to be the drive cage at fault, wasted a lot of drives pandering to the controller's requests.

can you not use the array manager on power-up (CTRL+S) or the Windows Array Admin to check the status of the array, to see if it acknowledges the new drive, or in case you manually need to drop it back in (might be a firmware issue on the new drive, being far newer than the existing drives).  Certainly worth checking the firmware of everything -- HP have special ISO you can download called Firmware or ROMPaq CD, which will contain storage & controller firmware as well as BIOS etc..... for your model of server.

You should be able to access them here - http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/SoftwareIndex.jsp?lang=en&cc=us&prodNameId=3279705&prodTypeId=15351&prodSeriesId=316537&swLang=8&taskId=135&swEnvOID=1005
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andyalderSaggar maker's bottom knockerCommented:
Unfortunately the firmware update that deals with SCSI ID changes is only for the 64x and 6400 and above only, not the 53x series. Only way to update the RIS is to put a MSA30 on the external channel and move all the disks to that, then replace the drive because there's now an ID6 available, then after rebuild power down and move it to slot 2 and it should rewrite the RIS to reflect the drive slot change, then put the disks back internally.
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fa2lerrorAuthor Commented:
Thanks everyone for the response. I came to here as a 2nd opinion to HP saying it was a failed drive cage. From what I could tell the drive failed and during the fail process some how was given a SCSI ID of 6. The drive cage while it has 6 drive bays have SCSI assignments of 0 - 5. Thus the problem. I suppose if I had a spare I could have added it as an additional for the extra slots. I was already aware of the HP firmware and driver updates cds. It is on our maintenance plans to update every quarter.

My solution was a little primitive. I used an IDE drive and created a Windows Mirror. Replaced the failed drive (later tested and verified bad). Deleted the Array with failed drive. Recreated array with good drive. Joined back is as mirror. then removed the ide drive. There were several breaking of mirrors and arrays during the process. The event log went crazy due to speed differences. In the end with all said and done it was a week long project that consisted of 2 scheduled 15 min shutdowns to install/remove the drive and initial reboot to convert the failed boot array as a dynamic before I could create the windows mirror. That was a scary feeling. Always have a tested good backup before starting. all other tasks of creating/destroying mirror were preformed without logging out or needing to adjust the boot.ini.
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