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local computer vs. local admin on domain - Need proper terminology clarification

Posted on 2009-07-02
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Last Modified: 2012-05-07
Hello, my question is not really how to do this, it's more on the terminology I should use when describing it.

Let say I was on a domain enviroment, let's call it 'Litwareinc.com' and I had several xp clients.  Let's call one of my xp clients 'Computer1' and 'User1' has these rights below:

User Name                         Domain                      Group
user1                                 Litwareinc                  Administrators
user1                                 Comptuer1                 Administrators

I know exactly how to configure this.  But my question is, how would you describe 'user1', what is the proper description of what kind of user he is?
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Question by:jkimzlg
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by:Naerwen
ID: 24763706
user 1 is a domain administrator AS WELL as an administrator on the local machine.
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by:jkimzlg
ID: 24764110
but doesn't domain administrator sound like domain admin on AD?  if you said just domain administrator would someone know that you were referring to an xp client computer?
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by:spamster
ID: 24764142
User 1 is a domain administrator and local administrator
If you say he's a domain admin or domain administrator, it would mean that he's an administrator of the LitwareInc domain - which also means that by default he's a local administrator on every computer.
If you said just "domain administrator" I don't think anyone in the field would guess you were talking about a local computer administrator.
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by:Naerwen
ID: 24764525
It would depend on the context of your discussion. Domain Admins are, by default,  local administrators. So if you are in a discussion with someone and said "I am the domain admin." That person would assume that you are also a local administrator on the client's machine.
Alternativelty, if your organization is huge 500-1000+ then being a domain admin doesn't necessarily mean that you have unrestricted access to all the computers within a given domain. It would depend on many variables. In my current network, we do not make users local administrators at all. And we are not, domain administrators. We are part of an OU that has a GPO assined to it and that gives us the administrative access that we need to execute our work.
 
Naerwen
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by:Mike Kline
ID: 24764724
but doesn't domain administrator sound like domain admin on AD?  if you said just domain administrator would someone know that you were referring to an xp client computer?
Like others have said domain admins have rights over everything...in fact a savy domain admin can take control of the forest.  
I basically equate domain admins to "god rights"...so you have to be careful who is in that group.
Thanks
Mike
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by:jkimzlg
ID: 24765546

I'm only talking about the WIN XP CLIENT COMPUTER:

User Name                         Domain                      Group
user1                                 Litwareinc                  Administrators

"user1 is a Domain Administrator on this computer ONLY."  is this the correct way of saying it?  is there a better way to say this?  or am I still wrong?
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spamster earned 250 total points
ID: 24765582
No, then user1 is a "Local Administrator on Computer1"
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by:jkimzlg
ID: 24765667
Maybe I am not explaining this correctly.  

User Name                         Domain                      Group
user1                                 Litwareinc                  Administrators             (domain is Litwareinc.com)
user1                                 Computer1                 Administrators              (Computer 1 (this computer))

again, this is all configured on win xp client named Computer1.  
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by:Naerwen
ID: 24765700
No, user1 is not a "Domain Administrator" on Computer 1... He is only a "Local Administrator" on "Computer 1".
 
 
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by:pnrhait
ID: 24765719
User Name                         Domain                      Group
user1                                 Litwareinc                  Administrators (Domain Admin)
user1                                 Comptuer1                 Administrators (Local Admin)

It also depends on how the user logs in for the proper terminology. If user1 logs into Litwareinc Domain then he is logging in using his Domain Admin account, but if he logs into the computer locally then he is using his local admin account.


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by:Naerwen
Naerwen earned 250 total points
ID: 24765743
Let say I was on a domain enviroment, let's call it 'Litwareinc.com' and I had several xp clients.  Let's call one of my xp clients 'Computer1' and 'User1' has these rights below:

User Name                         Domain                      Group
user1                                 Litwareinc                  Administrators
user1                                 Comptuer1                 Administrators

 
 
Then, in that case, in conversation, you would say; "I have a computer that is part of a domain and I am the 'Local Admin' on it." This would indicate to the other person that you are the administrator of the machine. The other person may or may not assume you are a Domain Administrator.

Naerwen
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Author Comment

by:jkimzlg
ID: 24766607
appreciate the help, thanks for trying to answer my question.

I think this is what i wanted, if anyone has anything to add please do.

User Name                         Domain                      Group
user1                                 Litwareinc                  Administrators             (domain is Litwareinc.com)
user1                                 Computer1                 Administrators              (Computer 1 (this computer))

"user1 has an 'Admin Account' on computer1, and user1 is a local administrator on computer1 on the Litwareinc domain"
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